Category Archives: Inspiration

The Muses & the 7 days of the week

Which days of the week are associated with the muses?

In Greek mythology, the Muses are typically associated with different areas of the arts and sciences, but they are not specifically associated with particular days of the week. However, there is a traditional Western association of the days of the week with planets and deities. If we were to loosely associate the Muses with the days of the week based on their domains and the traditional associations, it might look something like this:

  1. Calliope (Epic Poetry) – Monday (associated with the Moon)
  2. Clio (History) – Tuesday (associated with Mars, god of war and bravery)
  3. Euterpe (Music) – Wednesday (associated with Mercury, messenger of the gods)
  4. Thalia (Comedy) – Thursday (associated with Jupiter, king of the gods)
  5. Melpomene (Tragedy) – Friday (associated with Venus, goddess of love and beauty)
  6. Terpsichore (Dance) – Saturday (associated with Saturn, god of time)
  7. Erato (Love Poetry) – Sunday (associated with the Sun)

Please note that this is a loose and modern interpretation and not a traditional association from ancient mythology.

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Vegetarian Lifestyle of the Nazoreans

The vegetarian lifestyle of the Nazoreans has been a longstanding topic of debate among religious scholars. While the practice of not consuming animal products has been maintained for more than two thousand years, there is a general lack of consensus regarding its origin and development over time. This paper will explore the various theories that have been suggested by scholars regarding the vegetarian lifestyle of the Nazoreans. Additionally, the most current peer-reviewed studies on the topic are analyzed in order to bring attention to both the complexities and benefits associated with the practice.

The first and most prominent theory regarding the origin of Nazorean vegetarianism dates back to ancient Judaism. This line of argument claims that Moses and the ancient Israelites, who were vegan by choice, inspired the Nazoreans and their choice to abstain from animal products. Other historical accounts suggest that the vegetarian lifestyle of the Nazoreans was adopted from the Essenes, a Jewish sect known for their asceticism and dietary restrictions. While these theories are all viable options for consideration, more recent scholarship has focused on the ritual practices of the Nazoreans as an indication of their adherence to the vegetarian lifestyle.

Peer-reviewed studies have provided substantive evidence indicating that the vegetarian lifestyle of the Nazoreans was related to a variety of rituals and ceremonies, including seasonal feasts and special occasions. For instance, one study found that during the Egyptian festivals of Pascha and Unleavened Bread, all animal products were abstained from and replaced with plant-based alternatives in celebration. During these times, the consumption of animal products was thought to be both a violation of the Nazoreans’ faith and an act of impurity. Scholars believe that this ritual abstinence provided an impetus for the development and maintenance of the Nazorean vegetarian lifestyle.

In addition to this ritualistic motivation, contemporary scholars have suggested that the provision of animal-free food was motivated by both ethical and health-related considerations. Existing evidence suggests that vegetarian diets positively benefit both emotions and physical health, and it is possible that the Nazoreans valued these dietary considerations. Furthermore, it has been argued that the features of the Nazorean diet, such as its inclusion of vegetables, legumes, and fruits, may have been seen as a means to promote harmony and balance within the community.

In conclusion, the vegetarian lifestyle of the Nazoreans is a complex phenomenon that has been the subject of numerous scholarly debates for more than two thousand years. While a variety of theories have been proposed regarding its origin, the most recently published peer-reviewed studies suggest that the practice has been influenced by a range of motivations, including ritualistic practices, diet considerations, and ethical considerations. As research on the topic continues, further insight into the relationship between the Nazorean vegetarian lifestyle and its social and cultural background may be revealed.

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The Hidden History of Greco-Roman Vegetarianism

If asked about ancient Greece or Rome, the average American conjures images of famous battles, myths, and Hollywood movies. However, overlooked by the majority of modern Americans is the hidden history of ancient Greek and Roman vegetarianism and the ageless debate upon what justice is due animals. Many people assume that the predominant omnivorous diet has been the accepted diet from past to present, but history tells a different story. In addition, past philosophers reveal a fierce debate not only over diet, but about the notion of justice and to whom it applies. The debate has not ended, but in order to know where the future of this debate should go, this past should be known by all participants.

Plato

Before diving into the teachings of the Greek and Roman philosophers, it is important that the Greek and Roman diet be understood. For the Greeks and Romans, cereals, vegetables, and fruit composed much of their diet. The meat that was consumed was usually fish, fowl, or pigs, which were the cheapest and most convenient animals people could kill for their flesh. However, only the wealthiest citizens could afford to eat large amounts of meat on a regular basis.

The first philosopher in the West to create a lasting vegetarian legacy was the Greek teacher Pythagoras. He was born on the island of Samos in 580 BCE and studied in what are now the countries of Greece, Egypt, and Iraq before establishing his school in southern Italy at the city of Croton. While Pythagoras is famous for his contributions to math, music, science, and philosophy, it is his philosophy that is of particular interest. He taught that all animals, not just humans, had souls, which were immortal and reincarnated after death. Since a human might become an animal at death, and an animal might become a human, Pythagoras believed that killing and eating non-human animals sullied the soul and prevented union with a higher form of reality. Additionally, he felt that eating meat was unhealthy and made humans wage war against one another. For these reasons, he abstained from meat and encouraged others to do likewise, perhaps making him one of the earliest campaigners for ethical vegetarianism.

The Greek philosopher Plato (428/427-348/347 BCE) was influenced by Pythagorean concepts but did not go as far as Pythagoras did. It is unclear exactly what his diet consisted of, but Plato’s teachings asserted only humans had immortal souls and that the universe was for human use. Yet, in The Republic, Plato’s character Socrates asserted that the ideal city was a vegetarian city on the grounds that meat was a luxury leading to decadence and war. Thus, to Plato, abstention from flesh is warranted out of a desire for peace and an avoidance of indulgent, excessive living.

Plato’s student Aristotle (384-322 BCE) also felt the universe was for human use and that only human souls were immortal. Additionally, he argued in favor of a hierarchy of beings in which plants occupied the lowest rung of the ladder and humans the highest. In this hierarchy, Aristotle argued that women were lesser compared to men and some humans were natural slaves. As for animals, as Norm Phelps in The Longest Strugglepoints out, Aristotle reasoned that there was no ethical obligation to animals because they were irrational. Colin Spencer, in The Heretic’s Feast, noted that Aristotle argued non-human animals could not manage themselves without human aid in spite of all evidence to the contrary. In short, Aristotle established many reasons used against giving proper justice to non-human and human animals alike.

Aristotle was not the only philosopher to advance some of these views. According to Spencer, the founder of Stoicism, Zeno (c. 335-c. 263 BCE), like Aristotle, argued that there was a hierarchy of beings with plants lowest and humans highest. Similarly, Spencer said Zeno declared animals undeserving of justice due to their inability to reason, but, unlike Aristotle, he sustained himself on a diet of bread, honey, and water. Zeno demonstrated that people have embraced a vegetarian diet for many reasons and while they may not be out of concern for animals, the vegetarian diet itself was seen as providing a wholesome way of life.

A contemporary of Zeno’s was the philosopher Epicurus (341-270 BCE). Epicurus agreed that the universe was for humans. Spencer said Epicurus differed from the above philosophers by arguing that souls cease to exist at death; thus, death was nothing to fear. Another core element to his philosophy was a belief in the goodness of pleasure and the evil of pain. He thought that desire caused pain, and human dependence on temporary pleasures deprived them of true pleasure. Because of this belief, Epicurus did not eat meat as it was a luxury that distracted people from a better life. However, he made no prohibition against eating flesh, which allowed the practice to continue among adopters of his creed. While he lack a stated prohibition, his personal example illustrated what he thought was the ideal way to live, and so, like Zeno, provided another historical support in favor of the vegetarian diet.

Arguing against Aristotle’s views on animals was Aristotle’s pupil and friend Theophrastus (c. 372-c. 287 BCE), a Greek biologist and philosopher. Theophrastus argued that killing animals for food was wasteful and morally wrong. Hypothesizing as to the origin of flesh eating, he argued that war must have forced humans to eat meat by ruining the crops that they otherwise would have eaten. Unlike his teacher, Theophrastus proclaimed that animal sacrifices angered the gods and turned humanity towards atheism. Clearly, religious arguments have long been used as motivation to pursue a vegetarian diet.

Preserving the legacy of Pythagoras was the poet and moralist Ovid (43 BCE-17 CE). Ovid was a Pythagorean-influenced Stoic, who was exiled to Tomis in 8 CE by the emperor Augustus. In his poem Metamorphoses, Ovid evoked the passionate pleas of Pythagoras for people to abandon animal sacrifice and abstain from eating flesh. These passages kept the memory of Pythagoras alive and served as testament to Ovid’s own vegetarian lifestyle.

Influenced by Pythagoras and Epicurus, the Roman philosopher Seneca (c. 4 BCE-65 CE) adopted a vegetarian diet. Spencer states that Seneca denounced the cruelty of the games used by Rome to distract the citizenry and challenged the decadence of his time. Seneca was forced to hide his vegetarianism for a time under the emperor Caligula due to Caligula’s distrust. Under the emperor Nero, his former student, Seneca was forced to commit suicide at age 60, due either to rumors in the court or Nero’s jealousy.

Another Greek philosopher who argued on behalf of animals was the biographer and philosopher Plutarch (46-c. 120 CE). Influenced by Pythagorean philosophy, Plutarch adopted a vegetarian diet and wrote several essays in favor of vegetarianism as well as arguing that animals were rational and deserving of consideration. In particular, his essay On the Eating of Flesh is noteworthy for some arguments familiar to today’s vegetarians, such as the inefficiency of the human digestive system to handle flesh or the fact that humans lack the claws and fangs necessary for to the satisfaction of a carnivorous appetite. For these reasons, Plutarch is truly noteworthy as one of the earliest advocates of animal issues.

After Plutarch, the Greek philosopher Plotinus (205-270 CE) combined Pythagoreanism, Platonism, and Stoicism into a school of philosophy called Neoplatonism. He taught that all animals feel pain and pleasure, not just humans. According to Jon Gregerson, author of Vegetarianism: A History, Plotinus believed in order for humans to unite with the Supreme Reality, humans had to treat all animals with compassion. Seeking to practice what he preached, Plotinus avoided medicine made from animals. He allowed for the wearing of wool and the use of animals for farm labor, but he mandated humane treatment.

Continuing the work of Plotinus was the great Phoenician author and philosopher Porphyry (c. 232-c. 305 CE). He argued with observational and historical evidence in defense of vegetarianism and the rationality of animals. According to Spencer, in On the Impropriety of Killing Living Beings for Food, Porphyry argued meat eating encouraged violence, demonstrated the ability of animals to reason, and argued that justice should be extended to them. Like Plutarch, Porphyry ranks as one of the greatest voices for early Western vegetarianism.

Vegetarianism and animal rights have a long history in Western civilization stretching to antiquity that is unknown or forgotten by many people today. What this hidden history teaches is that many Greeks and Romans survived without eating animal flesh or using animal products. Likewise, it teaches that arguments for and against animal rights are as ancient as Greek philosophy. It demonstrates that many of the same reasons for not eating flesh today are the same as those in the past whether out of spirituality, health, peace, or justice. Furthermore, the modern animal rights movement is built upon this past. Finally, this information presents important voices that should be considered in the debate on vegetarianism and animal rights.

Nathan Morgan

Nathan Morgan, a 2010 graduate of Montana State University Billings, gave a paper on the topic of vegetarianism in the classical world at a recent animal welfare conference in Minneapolis.

Bust of Plato

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Shiva’s Love Transforms Village

In the mystical realm of ancient India, Lord Shiva, the powerful and enigmatic deity, resided atop the sacred Mount Kailash. His matted hair held the flowing Ganges River, while his third eye radiated an all-seeing wisdom that pierced through the veils of reality.

One day, as the sun dipped below the horizon, casting a warm glow upon the land, Lord Shiva decided to visit the mortal world in disguise. He transformed himself into an old sage and descended to a bustling village.

In the village, the people were facing a dire drought, and their crops withered under the scorching sun. The villagers gathered around the old sage, seeking his guidance. With compassion in his eyes, Lord Shiva gently touched the parched earth. Miraculously, water began to bubble forth from the ground, quenching the land’s thirst.

The villagers were overjoyed and thanked the sage for his miraculous intervention. They insisted he stay, offering him food and shelter. Lord Shiva humbly accepted their hospitality and dwelled among them, imparting his wisdom and teaching them the ways of harmony and balance.

As time passed, the villagers learned the value of compassion, kindness, and unity. They started treating one another with respect, nurturing the land and its creatures. Crops flourished, and the village prospered.

One evening, as the villagers gathered around the sage to listen to his teachings, a young girl named Parvati approached. There was an air of innocence and curiosity about her. Lord Shiva noticed her keen interest in the lessons and smiled warmly.

Over the days that followed, Parvati continued to attend the sage’s teachings, and a deep bond formed between her and Lord Shiva. Unbeknownst to the villagers, Parvati was an incarnation of the divine goddess herself.

Impressed by her devotion and wisdom, Lord Shiva revealed his true form to Parvati, and their love blossomed. Their union symbolized the intertwining of the masculine and feminine energies, and their divine dance created a cosmic balance that brought harmony to the universe.

As years went by, Lord Shiva’s time among the villagers came to an end, and he returned to Mount Kailash with Parvati by his side. The village, now a thriving community, continued to live by the teachings they had learned from the sage.

And so, the legend of Lord Shiva’s visit to the mortal world lived on, a tale of compassion, transformation, and the enduring power of love that forever shaped the destiny of the village and the hearts of its people.

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The Gnostic Christ

In the realm of sacred knowing, the Gnostic Christ does dwell,
A timeless presence, a divine spark, a truth no tongue can tell.
Beyond the bounds of mortal flesh, transcendent and profound,
In mystic whispers, hidden truths, eternal wisdom found.

His eyes ablaze with cosmic fire, a love that knows no end,
He guides us through the labyrinth, our souls to mend and mend.
A teacher of the inner path, he leads us to the light,
Through trials and tribulations, he holds us through the night.

The Gnostic Christ, a mystic sage, his essence ever near,
In sacred texts and secret lore, his message we revere.
He unveils the illusion’s veil, the mysteries to explore,
A guide to seek the hidden truths, the treasures to restore.

With gnosis as our lantern, we journey through the soul,
A quest for deeper understanding, to make our spirits whole.
In union with the divine spark, the Christ within us gleams,
The Gnostic path of love and light, forever in our dreams.

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Shiva Linga & Yoni

The Shiva Linga and Yoni are ancient and revered symbols in Hinduism, carrying profound esoteric and spiritual significance. They represent the divine union of Shiva, the masculine principle, and Shakti, the feminine principle, embodying the cosmic forces of creation and dissolution.

The Shiva Linga, often depicted as a cylindrical or elliptical stone structure, is symbolic of Lord Shiva, the supreme consciousness and the eternal aspect of the divine. It is considered a representation of the unmanifest, formless nature of Shiva. The shape of the Linga is said to represent the cosmic pillar, or axis mundi, connecting the earthly realm with the spiritual realm. It is a symbol of transcendence, reminding devotees of the infinite and timeless nature of the divine.

The Yoni, on the other hand, represents the cosmic womb and the creative power of Shakti, the divine feminine energy. It is often depicted as a circular or triangular base upon which the Shiva Linga stands. The Yoni signifies the primordial source of all existence and fertility, the origin of life itself. It represents the dynamic aspect of creation, nurturing, and sustenance.

The union of the Shiva Linga and Yoni represents the harmonious balance and interdependence of the masculine and feminine energies in the universe. It symbolizes the inseparable unity of Shiva and Shakti, representing the divine union of opposites, consciousness and energy, stillness and movement. This sacred union is believed to give rise to the entire cosmos and all of creation.

Esoterically, the Shiva Linga and Yoni also hold deeper metaphysical meanings. The Linga signifies the concentrated and focused spiritual energy within every individual, often referred to as the inner flame or the divine spark. The Yoni, in turn, represents the receptive aspect of our being, the vessel through which we receive and assimilate divine grace and wisdom.

The worship of the Shiva Linga and Yoni is a way for devotees to connect with the divine energies within themselves and in the universe. It is a practice that seeks to transcend duality and realize the oneness of all existence. Through devotion, meditation, and rituals associated with these symbols, followers of Hinduism seek spiritual growth, self-realization, and union with the divine.

Om Namah Shivaya ~ Om Shiva Shakti

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Secrets of the Moon Princess & the Magi – Poem

In the realm of shadows and veiled twilight’s hue,
A tale whispers of a princess, ethereal and true.
Her gaze, a portal to the moon’s mystic fire,
A path to secrets, her spirit did aspire.

Beneath celestial tapestries, her dreams unfurled,
An ancient call beckoned her to an arcane world.
The great Magi, masters of wisdom’s sublime art,
Unveiled veils of perception, playing their part.

Silent whispers guided her through veils of mist,
An initiation shrouded in secrets they insist.
Eyes wide open, she embraced the lunar dance,
Seeking wisdom’s nectar, her soul in trance.

Each crescent beam whispered arcane rhymes,
As the princess learned to read between timeless chimes.
Moon’s luminescence painted her mind’s canvas,
Etching the constellations of destiny’s compass.

From the celestial forge, the Magi’s whispers flowed,
Their teachings woven in the cosmic code.
She deciphered the moon’s cryptic design,
Gained insights hidden in lunar shine.

A symphony of secrets echoed in her heart,
As her soul transcended, seeking the mystical art.
Princess and Magi became one in celestial blend,
Bound by moonlight’s touch, an eternal transcend.

In shadows and moonbeams, their secret alliance,
A testament to wisdom’s cosmic compliance.
The princess, adorned with lunar veils so rare,
Embraced the magi’s teachings with utmost care.

The world beheld her radiance, a moonlit grace,
A princess veiled in mystery’s celestial embrace.
Her eyes, moon mirrors reflecting ethereal might,
Guided by the Magi’s arcane, infinite light.

Power of Forgiveness

To understand the significance of this quote, we must first recognize the powerful influence that forgiveness or lack thereof can have on our lives. Forgiveness is a complex and deeply personal process that involves letting go of anger, resentment, and the desire for revenge. It requires us to release the negative emotions tied to a transgression and move towards healing and reconciliation. By forgiving, we free ourselves from the burden of carrying emotional baggage and open up space for personal growth and positive change.

However, when we choose not to forgive, we unwittingly subject ourselves to a continuous cycle of bitterness and negativity. Holding onto grudges often leads to a preoccupation with the past, constantly reliving the hurt and pain inflicted upon us. This preoccupation can poison our outlook on life, permeating our thoughts, actions, and relationships. The energy spent on resentment limits our ability to experience joy, peace, and fulfillment.

Furthermore, the refusal to forgive can lead to a dangerous transformation within ourselves. As we allow anger and resentment to consume us, we risk adopting the very qualities and behaviors we despise in others. The negativity and hostility that accompany an unforgiving mindset can seep into our interactions with others, eroding relationships and breeding a toxic environment.

By becoming what we refuse to forgive, we may inadvertently perpetuate the cycle of hurt and harm. Our actions and attitudes are influenced by the unresolved pain within us, leading us to repeat the very patterns that caused us suffering in the first place. In this way, our refusal to forgive can bind us to the negative energy and perpetuate a cycle of harm that affects not only ourselves but also those around us.

It is important to acknowledge that forgiveness is not synonymous with condoning or forgetting the wrongdoing. It does not require us to minimize or overlook the impact of the transgression. Instead, forgiveness is an act of self-empowerment and liberation. It allows us to transcend the hurt and pain, reclaim our emotional well-being, and break free from the negative influence of the past.

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Law of Attraction insights from Napoleon Hill

The Law of Attraction, as described by Napoleon Hill, encompasses the belief that thoughts and beliefs have the power to shape an individual’s reality. Hill’s teachings emphasize the concept that whatever we focus our minds on, whether positive or negative, we attract into our lives.

One of Hill’s notable quotes on the Law of Attraction states, “Whatever the mind can conceive and believe, it can achieve.” This encapsulates the idea that by cultivating a clear vision of our desires and wholeheartedly believing in their attainment, we create the necessary conditions for them to manifest in our lives. According to Hill, our thoughts act as a magnet, attracting corresponding experiences, circumstances, and opportunities.

Hill also highlights the importance of maintaining a positive mental attitude, stating, “Your mental attitude is the only thing you have complete and total control over.” This quote underscores the significance of cultivating a mindset of optimism and gratitude, as it sets the stage for the Law of Attraction to operate in our favor. By focusing on positive thoughts and emotions, we align ourselves with the positive forces of the universe, attracting positive outcomes.

Another essential aspect of the Law of Attraction, as outlined by Hill, is the power of visualization. He asserts, “Create a definite plan for carrying out your desire and begin at once, whether you are ready or not, to put this plan into action.” Hill suggests that by vividly imagining and visualizing our desired outcomes, we not only strengthen our belief in their achievement but also stimulate our subconscious mind to seek out opportunities and take inspired action towards their realization.

Moreover, Hill emphasizes the role of persistence and perseverance in utilizing the Law of Attraction effectively. He says, “Every adversity, every failure, every heartache carries with it the seed of an equal or greater benefit.” This quote highlights the idea that setbacks and challenges can serve as opportunities for growth and ultimately lead us closer to our goals. By maintaining a resilient and determined attitude, we can overcome obstacles and stay aligned with our desired outcomes.

In summary, according to Napoleon Hill’s teachings, the Law of Attraction centers around the power of thoughts, beliefs, and visualization. By focusing on positive thinking, cultivating a strong belief in our desires, visualizing our goals, and persistently taking action, we can harness the forces of the universe to manifest our aspirations and create the life we desire.

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The Eternal Love of Shiva & Parvati

In the realm where mystic rivers flow, In the embrace of ethereal glow, Two divine beings, a cosmic pair, Shiva and Parvati, a love beyond compare.

Shiva, the ascetic, with matted hair, A meditative soul in tranquil stare, Cloaked in ashes, the blue-skinned lord, In his presence, the universe is adored.

Parvati, radiant goddess of grace, With eyes that illuminate every space, Her beauty blossoms like flowers in bloom, Enchanting hearts with her celestial perfume.

In Mount Kailash, their celestial abode, Where serpents dance and mountains erode, Shiva meditates, detached and still, While Parvati’s love, his heart does fill.

Through eons of time, their love has endured, In cosmic dance, their union assured, Opposites they are, yet perfectly entwined, The eternal lovers, their souls aligned.

In the dance of creation, they unite, Their love a beacon, shining bright, From destruction to creation, they move as one, In the cosmic play, their love is spun.

In Ardhanarishvara, they merge as a whole, The divine balance, the cosmic goal, Male and female, fused in divine bliss, Their union a symbol of eternal oneness.

With Nandi, the bull, at Shiva’s feet, And Kartikeya, their son, so sweet, Ganesha, the elephant-headed one, Their celestial family, all love has won.

In their love, the universe finds solace, A divine romance, never to be erased, Shiva and Parvati, the cosmic flame, Igniting hearts, in love’s sacred name.

Through endless cycles, their story will flow, An eternal saga, forever aglow, Shiva and Parvati, divine and true, In their eternal love, we find our cue.

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