Tag Archives: essenes

Vegetarian Lifestyle of the Nazoreans

The vegetarian lifestyle of the Nazoreans has been a longstanding topic of debate among religious scholars. While the practice of not consuming animal products has been maintained for more than two thousand years, there is a general lack of consensus regarding its origin and development over time. This paper will explore the various theories that have been suggested by scholars regarding the vegetarian lifestyle of the Nazoreans. Additionally, the most current peer-reviewed studies on the topic are analyzed in order to bring attention to both the complexities and benefits associated with the practice.

The first and most prominent theory regarding the origin of Nazorean vegetarianism dates back to ancient Judaism. This line of argument claims that Moses and the ancient Israelites, who were vegan by choice, inspired the Nazoreans and their choice to abstain from animal products. Other historical accounts suggest that the vegetarian lifestyle of the Nazoreans was adopted from the Essenes, a Jewish sect known for their asceticism and dietary restrictions. While these theories are all viable options for consideration, more recent scholarship has focused on the ritual practices of the Nazoreans as an indication of their adherence to the vegetarian lifestyle.

Peer-reviewed studies have provided substantive evidence indicating that the vegetarian lifestyle of the Nazoreans was related to a variety of rituals and ceremonies, including seasonal feasts and special occasions. For instance, one study found that during the Egyptian festivals of Pascha and Unleavened Bread, all animal products were abstained from and replaced with plant-based alternatives in celebration. During these times, the consumption of animal products was thought to be both a violation of the Nazoreans’ faith and an act of impurity. Scholars believe that this ritual abstinence provided an impetus for the development and maintenance of the Nazorean vegetarian lifestyle.

In addition to this ritualistic motivation, contemporary scholars have suggested that the provision of animal-free food was motivated by both ethical and health-related considerations. Existing evidence suggests that vegetarian diets positively benefit both emotions and physical health, and it is possible that the Nazoreans valued these dietary considerations. Furthermore, it has been argued that the features of the Nazorean diet, such as its inclusion of vegetables, legumes, and fruits, may have been seen as a means to promote harmony and balance within the community.

In conclusion, the vegetarian lifestyle of the Nazoreans is a complex phenomenon that has been the subject of numerous scholarly debates for more than two thousand years. While a variety of theories have been proposed regarding its origin, the most recently published peer-reviewed studies suggest that the practice has been influenced by a range of motivations, including ritualistic practices, diet considerations, and ethical considerations. As research on the topic continues, further insight into the relationship between the Nazorean vegetarian lifestyle and its social and cultural background may be revealed.

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The Hidden History of Greco-Roman Vegetarianism

If asked about ancient Greece or Rome, the average American conjures images of famous battles, myths, and Hollywood movies. However, overlooked by the majority of modern Americans is the hidden history of ancient Greek and Roman vegetarianism and the ageless debate upon what justice is due animals. Many people assume that the predominant omnivorous diet has been the accepted diet from past to present, but history tells a different story. In addition, past philosophers reveal a fierce debate not only over diet, but about the notion of justice and to whom it applies. The debate has not ended, but in order to know where the future of this debate should go, this past should be known by all participants.

Plato

Before diving into the teachings of the Greek and Roman philosophers, it is important that the Greek and Roman diet be understood. For the Greeks and Romans, cereals, vegetables, and fruit composed much of their diet. The meat that was consumed was usually fish, fowl, or pigs, which were the cheapest and most convenient animals people could kill for their flesh. However, only the wealthiest citizens could afford to eat large amounts of meat on a regular basis.

The first philosopher in the West to create a lasting vegetarian legacy was the Greek teacher Pythagoras. He was born on the island of Samos in 580 BCE and studied in what are now the countries of Greece, Egypt, and Iraq before establishing his school in southern Italy at the city of Croton. While Pythagoras is famous for his contributions to math, music, science, and philosophy, it is his philosophy that is of particular interest. He taught that all animals, not just humans, had souls, which were immortal and reincarnated after death. Since a human might become an animal at death, and an animal might become a human, Pythagoras believed that killing and eating non-human animals sullied the soul and prevented union with a higher form of reality. Additionally, he felt that eating meat was unhealthy and made humans wage war against one another. For these reasons, he abstained from meat and encouraged others to do likewise, perhaps making him one of the earliest campaigners for ethical vegetarianism.

The Greek philosopher Plato (428/427-348/347 BCE) was influenced by Pythagorean concepts but did not go as far as Pythagoras did. It is unclear exactly what his diet consisted of, but Plato’s teachings asserted only humans had immortal souls and that the universe was for human use. Yet, in The Republic, Plato’s character Socrates asserted that the ideal city was a vegetarian city on the grounds that meat was a luxury leading to decadence and war. Thus, to Plato, abstention from flesh is warranted out of a desire for peace and an avoidance of indulgent, excessive living.

Plato’s student Aristotle (384-322 BCE) also felt the universe was for human use and that only human souls were immortal. Additionally, he argued in favor of a hierarchy of beings in which plants occupied the lowest rung of the ladder and humans the highest. In this hierarchy, Aristotle argued that women were lesser compared to men and some humans were natural slaves. As for animals, as Norm Phelps in The Longest Strugglepoints out, Aristotle reasoned that there was no ethical obligation to animals because they were irrational. Colin Spencer, in The Heretic’s Feast, noted that Aristotle argued non-human animals could not manage themselves without human aid in spite of all evidence to the contrary. In short, Aristotle established many reasons used against giving proper justice to non-human and human animals alike.

Aristotle was not the only philosopher to advance some of these views. According to Spencer, the founder of Stoicism, Zeno (c. 335-c. 263 BCE), like Aristotle, argued that there was a hierarchy of beings with plants lowest and humans highest. Similarly, Spencer said Zeno declared animals undeserving of justice due to their inability to reason, but, unlike Aristotle, he sustained himself on a diet of bread, honey, and water. Zeno demonstrated that people have embraced a vegetarian diet for many reasons and while they may not be out of concern for animals, the vegetarian diet itself was seen as providing a wholesome way of life.

A contemporary of Zeno’s was the philosopher Epicurus (341-270 BCE). Epicurus agreed that the universe was for humans. Spencer said Epicurus differed from the above philosophers by arguing that souls cease to exist at death; thus, death was nothing to fear. Another core element to his philosophy was a belief in the goodness of pleasure and the evil of pain. He thought that desire caused pain, and human dependence on temporary pleasures deprived them of true pleasure. Because of this belief, Epicurus did not eat meat as it was a luxury that distracted people from a better life. However, he made no prohibition against eating flesh, which allowed the practice to continue among adopters of his creed. While he lack a stated prohibition, his personal example illustrated what he thought was the ideal way to live, and so, like Zeno, provided another historical support in favor of the vegetarian diet.

Arguing against Aristotle’s views on animals was Aristotle’s pupil and friend Theophrastus (c. 372-c. 287 BCE), a Greek biologist and philosopher. Theophrastus argued that killing animals for food was wasteful and morally wrong. Hypothesizing as to the origin of flesh eating, he argued that war must have forced humans to eat meat by ruining the crops that they otherwise would have eaten. Unlike his teacher, Theophrastus proclaimed that animal sacrifices angered the gods and turned humanity towards atheism. Clearly, religious arguments have long been used as motivation to pursue a vegetarian diet.

Preserving the legacy of Pythagoras was the poet and moralist Ovid (43 BCE-17 CE). Ovid was a Pythagorean-influenced Stoic, who was exiled to Tomis in 8 CE by the emperor Augustus. In his poem Metamorphoses, Ovid evoked the passionate pleas of Pythagoras for people to abandon animal sacrifice and abstain from eating flesh. These passages kept the memory of Pythagoras alive and served as testament to Ovid’s own vegetarian lifestyle.

Influenced by Pythagoras and Epicurus, the Roman philosopher Seneca (c. 4 BCE-65 CE) adopted a vegetarian diet. Spencer states that Seneca denounced the cruelty of the games used by Rome to distract the citizenry and challenged the decadence of his time. Seneca was forced to hide his vegetarianism for a time under the emperor Caligula due to Caligula’s distrust. Under the emperor Nero, his former student, Seneca was forced to commit suicide at age 60, due either to rumors in the court or Nero’s jealousy.

Another Greek philosopher who argued on behalf of animals was the biographer and philosopher Plutarch (46-c. 120 CE). Influenced by Pythagorean philosophy, Plutarch adopted a vegetarian diet and wrote several essays in favor of vegetarianism as well as arguing that animals were rational and deserving of consideration. In particular, his essay On the Eating of Flesh is noteworthy for some arguments familiar to today’s vegetarians, such as the inefficiency of the human digestive system to handle flesh or the fact that humans lack the claws and fangs necessary for to the satisfaction of a carnivorous appetite. For these reasons, Plutarch is truly noteworthy as one of the earliest advocates of animal issues.

After Plutarch, the Greek philosopher Plotinus (205-270 CE) combined Pythagoreanism, Platonism, and Stoicism into a school of philosophy called Neoplatonism. He taught that all animals feel pain and pleasure, not just humans. According to Jon Gregerson, author of Vegetarianism: A History, Plotinus believed in order for humans to unite with the Supreme Reality, humans had to treat all animals with compassion. Seeking to practice what he preached, Plotinus avoided medicine made from animals. He allowed for the wearing of wool and the use of animals for farm labor, but he mandated humane treatment.

Continuing the work of Plotinus was the great Phoenician author and philosopher Porphyry (c. 232-c. 305 CE). He argued with observational and historical evidence in defense of vegetarianism and the rationality of animals. According to Spencer, in On the Impropriety of Killing Living Beings for Food, Porphyry argued meat eating encouraged violence, demonstrated the ability of animals to reason, and argued that justice should be extended to them. Like Plutarch, Porphyry ranks as one of the greatest voices for early Western vegetarianism.

Vegetarianism and animal rights have a long history in Western civilization stretching to antiquity that is unknown or forgotten by many people today. What this hidden history teaches is that many Greeks and Romans survived without eating animal flesh or using animal products. Likewise, it teaches that arguments for and against animal rights are as ancient as Greek philosophy. It demonstrates that many of the same reasons for not eating flesh today are the same as those in the past whether out of spirituality, health, peace, or justice. Furthermore, the modern animal rights movement is built upon this past. Finally, this information presents important voices that should be considered in the debate on vegetarianism and animal rights.

Nathan Morgan

Nathan Morgan, a 2010 graduate of Montana State University Billings, gave a paper on the topic of vegetarianism in the classical world at a recent animal welfare conference in Minneapolis.

Bust of Plato

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The Secret Lineage of Mary Magdalene – Poem

In hidden whispers, tales unfold,
Of Mary Magdalene, her lineage untold.
Gnostic visions, veiled in mist,
A sacred journey, her essence kissed.

Born of ancient mystic kin,
Her bloodline woven, a sacred spin.
A vessel of truths, she carried the lore,
From realms beyond, she did explore.

From desert sands to starlit skies,
Her wisdom soared, where angels rise.
In sacred union, she found her way,
An alchemical dance, night to day.

Gnostic flame, a torch she bore,
Through timeless realms, forevermore.
Her secret lineage, a cosmic thread,
Woven in stars, where mystics tread.

Divine feminine, a cosmic guide,
In her presence, seekers abide.
Mary Magdalene, keeper of keys,
Unveils the secrets, across all seas.

Through aeons passed, her light shines bright,
A beacon of truth, in the depths of night.
Gnostic whispers, a sacred rhyme,
Mary’s lineage transcends all time.

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Nazorean Wisdom Unveiled

Once upon a time, in a quaint village nestled amidst rolling hills, there lived a community known as the Nazoreans. They were a group of individuals who were revered by the villagers for their profound wisdom and unwavering commitment to the pursuit of truth and knowledge.

The Nazoreans were believed to be the branches of a timeless perennial wisdom that had been passed down through the ages. They were the custodians of ancient teachings and were entrusted with the responsibility of preserving and disseminating this invaluable wisdom to future generations.

From an early age, the Nazorean children were initiated into a rigorous training regimen. They would gather in a sacred grove, surrounded by ancient trees, to learn from the wise elders who imparted their knowledge with great reverence and care. The children were taught the secrets of the universe, the interconnectedness of all things, and the importance of living in harmony with nature.

As they grew older, the Nazoreans embarked on individual quests to deepen their understanding of the perennial wisdom. They traveled far and wide, seeking out ancient texts, studying under enlightened masters, and engaging in contemplative practices to unlock the hidden truths of existence.

Each Nazorean developed their unique area of expertise. Some delved into the mysteries of the stars, mapping constellations and deciphering the celestial language. Others immersed themselves in the healing arts, exploring the delicate balance between the body, mind, and spirit. Some studied the ancient scriptures and religious texts, drawing out the underlying spiritual principles that transcended time and culture.

Despite their diverse paths, the Nazoreans remained connected through a common thread—their unwavering commitment to the pursuit of wisdom and the greater good of humanity. They would periodically gather in the village square, where the elders would share their newfound insights and engage in spirited discussions that challenged and expanded their understanding.

The village revered the Nazoreans as beacons of knowledge and enlightenment. They sought their counsel in times of trouble and celebrated their achievements as if they were the triumphs of the entire community. The Nazoreans, in turn, embraced their role with humility, recognizing that the wisdom they possessed was not for personal gain but for the betterment of all.

As time passed, the village thrived under the guidance of the Nazoreans. Their wisdom permeated every aspect of life, shaping the values, customs, and relationships of the community. The villagers grew in their understanding of themselves and the world around them, finding solace and inspiration in the timeless teachings of the Nazoreans.

Generations came and went, but the perennial wisdom of the Nazoreans continued to flow like an eternal river. The village became a sanctuary of knowledge, a place where seekers from far and wide would come to drink from the well of wisdom that the Nazoreans had nurtured.

And so, the story of the Nazoreans as the branches of the timeless perennial wisdom of the ages became etched in the annals of history. Their legacy lived on, a testament to the transformative power of knowledge, and a reminder that the pursuit of wisdom was a lifelong journey that transcended the boundaries of time and space.

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Mary Magdalene an Ethiopian Princess?

The legends of Mary Magdalene being an Ethiopian princess date back to the ancient times of the 1st & 2nd centuries. It is said that she was born in Egypt, either the daughter of a wealthy Jewish merchant or a princess of Ethiopia, and that she was raised near the temple of Isis in Alexandria. She was a revered princess, where it was believed she was trained in the art of healing and possessed magical powers.

When Mary Magdalene was about eighteen she received a message from God telling her to leave her home and travel to Galilee. There, she met Jesus and immediately recognized him as the Son of God. She began to follow him, and it is said that she was the first female to do so. After Jesus performed miracles and preached, Mary became his closest follower, traveling frequently with him teaching his message. She was eventually recognized as an apostle and it is said that Jesus openly acknowledged her.

The fame of Mary Magdalene as a follower of Jesus would continue even after his death. During the time of his crucifixion it was said that she had remained faithful to him, and after his burial, it is said that she had gone to his tomb. As such, Mary Magdalene has since become known as a symbol for faith, hope, and redemption.

Many folk tales and legends exist about Mary Magdalene’s origins. One such story tells of a faithful soldier from Ethiopia who pledged his life to serve the Lord. This soldier supposedly had a daughter named Mary, who was raised in a wealthy, royal home and was taught the ways of healing and magic. Some believe that this daughter was actually Mary Magdalene.

Regardless of the myths and legends, Mary Magdalene remains an enigmatic and inspiring figure from history, who is seen as a symbol of faith, love, and hope. Her Ethiopian roots and background continue to mystify and fascinate both religious and non-religious followers alike.

Mary Magdalene, she was the apple of His eye,
His love for her held strong and deep and never did wander by.

He held her close and whispered soft, to her soul He could relate, and through their love they would transcend the meager trials of fate.

For Him she was a loving wife, whom He treasured to the core, the love between the two was like two birds forever they would soar.

The Holy Spirit was the link that brought them ever closer, their faith in each other kept them tighter than a silver closure.

The Sacred Union of the two upon a dark night in the woods, will be remembered till the end of time and the way that Mary could.

As Mary wept with divine love, she would cling tightly to His side, and while love in the world abounds, their bond is forever tied. ????

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Anatomy of Enlightenment & The Truth About the Serpent

The Anatomy of Enlightenment According to Esoteric Philosophy: A Look at “The Truth About the Serpent”

Esoteric philosophy speaks to the truth of the human spirit, providing a backdrop for understanding our connection to the cosmos and the divinity of our inherent selves. This ancient wisdom is rife with symbolism, particularly with reference to the serpent. One of its most beloved archetypes speaks to an anatomy that can unlock inner depths of power, passion and courage—essentially, it teaches us how to connect to our true selves and live a life of understanding and enlightenment. Taking a closer look at this ancient wisdom, let’s examine the anatomy of enlightenment as it relates to “the truth about the serpent” with references to how the Gnostics view the serpent, the idea of kundalini and the serpent in the Garden of Eden.

In regards to the Gnostics, the serpent archetype served as a symbol of the savior offering emancipation from ignorance and oppression. In the Gnostic creation story, the serpent is elevated to the status of saviour and teacher, elevating man to knowledge and understanding that is rooted in truth and freedom rather than imprisonment by ignorance. The serpent is also symbolic of the spiritual path, offering us divine knowledge as a way of liberating us from suffering and personal bondage. In esoteric philosophy, the image of the serpent is seen as a metaphor for spiritual knowledge and revealed truth—a representation of the power of awakening, or “yoga”, as it is commonly referred to—that exists within us, leading us on the path to enlightenment.

The serpent is particularly connected to the concept of kundalini energy. This energy is the power of pure, divine fluidity and movement within the body, awakening and opening the pathways to liberation and union with divine consciousness. Kundalini is understood to be a living force that resides within us, accessible through subtle yoga techniques and meditation. Through the channeling of kundalini energy, we can awaken the serpent within. Kundalini rises, also referred to as “Serpent Power”, connecting us with infinite sources of life-force and restoring the connection between our physical and spiritual bodies. The power of Kundalini is primal and pure, providing a route to the true self and ultimately the Divine.

The serpent also holds a special place in the story of the Garden of Eden. As the serpent in the garden, it is seen as a provider of knowledge and forbidden wisdom, enticing man and woman to come to understandings of truth, thus providing them with all the power of the divine. The serpent is seen as a figure of illuminative power and insight, providing the spark of understanding that propels us towards awakening and ultimately, enlightenment.

In summary, the anatomy of enlightenment is illuminated in the powerful symbolism of the serpent. As taught by esoteric philosophy and supported by the Gnostics, this archetype speaks to an inner power within each of us that can be recognized and tapped into via methods such as kundalini awakening and meditation. Additionally, the serpent serves to highlight the importance of knowledge and understanding and the power of this enlightenment in setting us free. Ultimately, by unlocking the mysteries of the serpent within, we can rise in our own power and activate the pathways of freedom, truth and connection to our greater source.

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The Apocalypse of Adam

Discovered in 1945, The Apocalypse of Adam. ?
The Apocalypse of Adam, also known as the Revelation of Adam is Adam’s version of what happened in the garden of Eden. ?


Part of which Reads: “I went about with her in a glory which she had seen in the aeon from which we had come forth. She taught me a word of knowledge of the eternal God. And we resembled the great eternal angels, for we were higher than the god who had created us and the powers with him, whom we did not know.” ?

Omitted from the Bible because of what it reveals. Eve and the serpent are the hero’s of the story teaching Adam’s fruits of eternal knowledge. To “eat from” means to “take in and digest, or to fully understand.” Eve was sent to Adam from the eternal father that Jesus spoke of to remind Adam of who he really is, a light being imprisoned in the material world by a jealous creator god. This creator god made this imperfect material world that he fashioned afrer the eternal heavenly realm. Adam’s soul is what was needed to animate the flesh suit the creator god made as a prison for his soul, claiming he is a jealous God, demanding worship and unquestionable faith. ?

Jesus also tells this story in another book omitted from the Bible called the “Secret Book of John,” discovered in a cave in 1945.

Jesus quotes the creator god, and asked a question which reads;
“I am a jealous God and there is no God but me!” ?

[But by doing this he admitted to his demons that there is indeed another God.
For, if there were no other God, whom would he possibly be jealous of?] ?


Where The Bible starts from the creation of earth, what’s learned is this is actually a galatic story. Adam’s soul is known in this story as “the first knowledge that breathed within him,” aka his eternal spirit which was stolen from the heavenly realm. Eve was sent by the true eternal father located at the center of the galaxy. This is the father Jesus spoke of when he came to deliver the same message to humanity to help free us from the prison of the material realm. ?


This different interpretation than the story in the Bible will lead you to your true identity.
? Gnosis or Awakening

Mystical Poetry for Queen Cleopatra

Time of Nile’s kings hath come to pass
Bringeth forth the great Queen of Egypt’s grass
Cleopatra the Seventh, treasure of lore,
Descended down the lineage to open a new door.
Her dynasty would foretell of a holy birth
Ancestor of a Son who cometh of Heaven’s mirth.

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Nazarene Church of Edessa

Hamat Zodiac of Tiberius, Galilee.

The Edessan-Nazarene Church was an initiatory ‘secret’ sect that took 7 years to join (this is how long it took Queen Helena). The Raising of Lazarus was a 3rd degree initiation demonstrating the hidden occult nature of the Church. A primary source of veneration for the Church was the zodiac and the Hamat zodiac at Tiberius was processional and depicted the Heliocentric solar system and a spherical blue-green Earth – long before Copernicus mentioned this, this Church possessed deep scientific and astronomical secrets. One of their symbols was the sacred elagabal stone – (Shiva Linga of Hinduism/ Kaba Stone of Islam) a sacred meteorite of great antiquity that may have been strongly magnetic. The Gali priests who venerated the stone were symbolic or possibly real eunuchs – suggesting that they venerated the Primeaval Adam, the First Man, who was androgynous. Pharaoh Akhenaton – the first pharaoh to depict himself as as androgynous and who is linked with the Exodus of the Hyksos (Israelite) people in Egypt and possibly the founder of Judaism – the Edessan-Nazarene Church followed this ancient tradition. The connection between the zodiac and the elagabal meteorite (the Phoenix) strongly suggests the Nazarene were Sabeans – star worshippers. We can see the processional zodiac once more in “Jesus” being born as Lamb of God (Aries) and becoming a Fisher of Men (Pisces). In the 18th century BC the Hyksos Israelites took on the might of Egypt to become the first of the Shepherd Kings (the Kings of Aries), because Taurus had turned to Aries in 1750 BC. Similarly, Jesus-Izas wanted to take on the might of Rome to become the first of the Fisher Kings (the King of Pisces) because Aries had turned to Pisces in AD 10. The Edessan Kings held the Kama (Kamza) title. Kama means “Black” coming from the land of Kam or Kemet/Egypt. In the works of Josephus he is called Jesus of Gamala. Gamala is another variant of Kamala meaning Jesus the Egyptian. In the works of Josephus, the Talmud & the New Testament we have Jesus being referred to as “the Egyptian” or “the Egyptian False Prophet” and stories of him doing Egyptian magic.

Jesus the Egyptian

Master Teacher Hamid Bey

Master Hamid Bey was trained by Coptic masters in Egypt during the early 1900’s. His early education was focused on fundamental principles of self mastery leading him to the ultimate goal of complete mastery on the physical, mental and emotional levels. His early testing put him in life situations where he taught humility, the foundation of spirituality. Eventually he was taught how to put pins through his body without pain and how to be buried alive for hours at a time.

In the mid-1920’s, he was sent to the United States to teach the laws of balanced living. He was told one of his early missions in America was to challenge Houdini, who had indicated he was the only one on earth who could accomplish his memorable feats. By the time Master Bey arrived in the U.S., Houdini had passed away.

In the late 1920’s, he met Paramahansa Yogananda and they traveled together throughout America. They were two of the earliest and greatest pioneers of the metaphysical movement. Paramahansa would give the lecture and Master Bey would be buried alive in public, demonstrating the many skills of self mastery he learned during his early years of training by the Egyptian Coptic Masters.