Tag Archives: history

10 Documentary Movies You Should See

I’ve watched some pretty intense documentaries lately, trying to learn more about history and WTF is going on right now.. 🧐🤔😨

Witches A Century of Murder (Netflix)

This one explains how fucked up it was the way the church brutally tortured and killed hundreds of thousands of innocent women and men for supposed witchcraft for unbelievable accusations.

JFK The Making of a President (Netflix)

Early life and rise to politics by JFK not much about his assassination, but interesting facts about his staged marriage and his heroic feat in the South Pacific where he rescued several men.

Hitler’s Circle of Evil (Netflix)

The depravity and evil in this one is intense but it profiles all of Hitler’s inner circle and explains how the Third Reich operated and became what it did and also how they all hated and betrayed each other in their pitiful attempts at ass-kissing to Hitler and their own play for power and control.

Jeffrey Epstein Filthy Rich (Netflix)

Disgusting story of Epstein and his web of sex trafficking for himself but hints at an international sex-ring with complicit implications towards people like Bill Clinton and Prince Edward and many other high profile people that associated with Epstein and hints at what is known as #Pizzagate

Alt-Right Age of Rage (Netflix)

Documentary showing the opposing sides and stories of a Black man who is one of the only publicly known and open Antifa Activists verses a White Supremacist man that leads White Supremacist rallies, and their interactions at various rallies and protests. Movie also details events around the Charlottesville car crash incident.

Kevin Hart’s Guide to Black History (Netflix)

Excellent and refreshing look into Black History from a Black man’s perspective. Kevin Hart ofcourse adds his thought-provoking humor and wit to tell stories and drive home the points he is making.

Genius of the Ancient World (Netflix)

All about the lives and philosophies of 3 of the greatest minds ever to grace our planet.. Buddha, Socrates & Confucius, they lived only 100 years or so apart from each other and how their philosophy and influence have shaped our world today.

Grey State (Netflix)

About a Iraq Vet who was filming a movie about the Deep State and New World Order and mysteriously he, his wife and child are murdered. The documentary seems to suggest a bizarre suicide.. but conspiracy theorists believe they were murdered by someone else, possibly the US Government.

In Search of the Great Beast 666 (Tubi)

Bizarre twisted history of Alestor Crowley, documents many disturbing but fascinating stories of his life and magick rituals and beliefs. Many of these Satanic secret societies that run the world today are descendants or inspired by the perverse Crowley teachings.

DaVinci’s Dark Secret (Tubi)

This one is about the secret lineage of Merovingian Kings and Serpent Bloodlines.

Down the 🕳🐇

How Memorial Day was stripped of it’s African-American Roots

If you didn’t know, which most people don’t, Memorial Day began as a celebration of black soldiers who fought in the U.S. Civil War. But White America decided to try to cover that up by making it a “Memorial Day” for all soldiers fighting in any U.S. War… which doesn’t sound like a bad thing but some of these wars were events which a lot of people don’t agree with and were cause of grave injustices and murder of innocent people. We may support the troops and those that served, but not always the wars they were serving. Check out this article about the origin of Memorial Day from this website: How Memorial Day was stripped of it’s African-American Roots

Below is an excerpt from the article:

What we now know as Memorial Day began as “Decoration Day” in the immediate aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. It was a tradition initiated by former slaves to celebrate emancipation and commemorate those who died for that cause.

These days, Memorial Day is arranged as a day “without politics”—a general patriotic celebration of all soldiers and veterans, regardless of the nature of the wars in which they participated. This is the opposite of how the day emerged, with explicitly partisan motivations, to celebrate those who fought for justice and liberation.

The concept that the population must “remember the sacrifice” of U.S. service members, without a critical reflection on the wars themselves, did not emerge by accident. It came about in the Jim Crow period as the Northern and Southern ruling classes sought to reunite the country around apolitical mourning, which required erasing the “divisive” issues of slavery and Black citizenship. These issues had been at the heart of the struggles of the Civil War and Reconstruction.

To truly honor Memorial Day means putting the politics back in. It means reviving the visions of emancipation and liberation that animated the first Decoration Days. It means celebrating those who have fought for justice, while exposing the cruel manipulation of hundreds of thousands of U.S. service members who have been sent to fight and die in wars for conquest and empire.

The First Decoration Day

As the U.S. Civil War came to a close in April 1865, Union troops entered the city of Charleston, S.C., where four years prior the war had begun. While white residents had largely fled the city, Black residents of Charleston remained to celebrate and welcome the troops, who included the TwentyFirst Colored Infantry. Their celebration on May 1, 1865, the first “Decoration Day,” later became Memorial Day.

Yale University historian David Blight retold the story:

During the final year of the war, the Confederates had converted the planters’ horse track, the Washington Race Course and Jockey Club, into an outdoor prison. Union soldiers were kept in horrible conditions in the interior of the track; at least 257 died of exposure and disease and were hastily buried in a mass grave behind the grandstand. Some 28 black workmen went to the site, re-buried the Union dead properly, and built a high fence around the cemetery. They whitewashed the fence and built an archway over an entrance on which they inscribed the words, “Martyrs of the Race Course.”Then, black Charlestonians in cooperation with white missionaries and teachers, staged an unforgettable parade of 10,000 people on the slaveholders’ race course. The symbolic power of the low-country planter aristocracy’s horse track (where they had displayed their wealth, leisure, and influence) was not lost on the freed people. A New York Tribune correspondent witnessed the event, describing “a procession of friends and mourners as South Carolina and the United States never saw before.”At 9 a.m. on May 1, the procession stepped off led by 3,000 black schoolchildren carrying armloads of roses and singing “John Brown’s Body.” The children were followed by several hundred black women with baskets of flowers, wreaths and crosses.

Then came black men marching in cadence, followed by contingents of Union infantry and other black and white citizens. As many as possible gathered in the cemetery enclosure; a children’s choir sang “We’ll Rally around the Flag,” the “Star-Spangled Banner,” and several spirituals before several black ministers read from scripture.

I hope you got lots of VALUE from this post! If you have questions or comments, please share your comments below! Thanks for visiting my blog!

~Sakshi Zion

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