Category Archives: Travel

Queen Scota – Egyptian Queen of Scotland

Once upon a time, there lived a beautiful and brave princess, who was known as Scota. She was the daughter of Pharaoh Ankhanaton.

The princess had heard many tales about the far away lands of Scotland, and she had a dream of exploring these unknown places. She decided to set off on an adventure, so she gathered her loyal servants and sailed away from the shores of Egypt.

During the journey, Scota and her entourage faced many perils, but her strength and courage kept them all safe. After a long and difficult voyage, they finally reached the shores of Scotland.

The princess was delighted by the beauty of her new home, and determined to make it her own. She sought out the local chieftains and forged alliances, offering them her friendship in exchange for their loyalty.

In time, the princess’s presence had a major impact in the region. The people of Scotland adopted the culture and religious teachings of Egypt, and Scota’s name passed into history as the beloved founder of the Scots people.

Over time, her legacy and influence only increased, and the stories about this beautiful and brave princess lived on for centuries. Even today, when people think of Scotland, the name of Scota is remembered fondly.

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Parallels between Hawaiian and Hindu Gods

The geographically and culturally distant civilizations of the ancient Hawaiians and Hindus of India share remarkable parallels in their religious deities. Though deities from each region are distinct, the divine figures of these two cultural pantheons used many of the same techniques to express the same religious ideals.  

Hawaiian gods and goddesses typically embody the natural elements of the islands, such as the ocean, mountains, rivers, and volcanoes. The Hawaiian pantheon has over 4,000 deities, each structured into a hierarchical family of gods and goddesses. Chief among the Hawaiian gods and goddesses is Ku; deity and personification of the primal darkness, chaos, and the process of creation and destruction. Ku, like the Hindu god, Shiva, is often depicted with various weapons and is associated with death, destruction, and fertility. Other Hawaiian gods and goddesses, including Kane the Sky Father, Kanaloa the god of the sea, and Pele the goddess of volcanoes, are similarly paralleled in the Hindu pantheon by Brahma, Vishnu, Shiva and the Goddess Kali.

In Hindu tradition, all gods are credited as aspects or manifestations of the ultimate reality that is Brahman. In the same way, the ultimate reality of the Hawaiian gods is expressed in their concept of Aumakua, who is the supreme being from which all the gods and goddesses originate. Aumakua (or Io, the Supreme One of Ancient Hawaiian tradition) is credited with having the ultimate power over death, destruction, and fertility. This conceptualization of a single source of all gods and goddesses echoes the monism expressed in the Hindu religion, where there is one unified source, Brahman, from which all aspects of reality emanate.

Other similarities between the Hindu and Hawaiian pantheons include the shared reverence for ancestors and the idea of kapu, or sacredness. Among Hindu gods, this reverence is expressed in the notion of ancestor worship, where offerings are made to the departed. The ancient Hawaiian religion also expresses similar veneration for departed ancestors. These ancestors are viewed as guides and protectors that inhabit the divine realm known as Po. In each culture, departed ancestors are thought to interact with the living and serve to protect them from harm.

Additionally, both Hawaiian and Hindu religions place strong emphasis on concepts such as respect, balance, and sustainability. As the Hawaiian gods maintain the ecological balance of the islands, the Hindu gods function in a similar manner throughout India. Respect and balance are seen in both pantheons as separate gods cooperate to maintain a sense of harmony and stability among the people. Nature veneration is also a shared concept between the two religious traditions, as humans are to show reverence to and respect the natural environment as sources of power and healing.

The parallels between the ancient gods of Hawaii and India demonstrate the remarkable ways in which two distant cultures can arrive at similar religious conceptualizations. Through each region’s pantheon of gods, common religious ideals emerge, emphasizing respect, resilience, and balance. Ultimately, the Hawaiian and Hindu gods serve as tangible reminders of the interconnectedness of global culture and religion.

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Ruda and Rudra: Parallels in Pre-Islamic and Vedic Society

For centuries, scholars have studied the similarities and differences between the polytheistic religions of the ancient world. One of the most interesting such comparisons is of Ruda and Rudra, two deities that each have roots in both the pre-Islamic era and the Vedic period. Through analysis of their shared gods, this article seeks to identify any possible commonalities of religious symbolism and practices in both regions.

Rudaw or Ruda is thought to be one of the chief gods in the ancient pre-Islamic polytheistic religion. He is said to have been a warlike god who brought violence and destruction to those who did not honor him. Rudra, meanwhile, is found within the Vedic religion and is thought to emerge from Indo-Aryan culture. He is known as the “storm god”, who symbolizes fear and the destructive power of nature and of the gods.

One key similarity between Ruda/Rudaw and Rudra is the symbolic relationship between violence and power. In both gods’ stories, there is an assumption that violence is necessary in order to maintain order and power in a community. This links back to the concept of “divine retribution,” a belief that the gods will punish those who have done wrong or have forgotten their devotion to the gods. This concept is found in both pre-Islamic and Vedic religions.

Another commonality between Rudaw and Rudra can be found in their dual-faced nature. Rudaw was thought to have two faces: a benevolent one, and a cruel one. This duality was seen as a reflection of the power of Rudaw. Similarly, Rudra is also said to be two- faced: a responsible and an indulgent one. This duality is often seen as an indication of Rudra’s complex nature, as well as a representation of the balance of power. 

Finally, both gods are associated with the moon, which holds a special significance in various ancient religions. For Rudaw, the moon symbolizes the cycle of life and death, as well as the power to create and destroy. For Rudra, the moon is a reminder of the never-ending cycle of life and death, as well as the power of the gods.

Despite some distinctions between Rudaw and Rudra, there are certainly a number of similarities to be drawn between them. Beyond the obvious comparison of the two gods, these similarities suggest a shared belief system in pre-Islamic and Vedic societies. Whether or not these connections had an influence or effect on one another remains an open question. 

Ultimately, it is clear that there are a number of similarities between Ruda and Rudra and their associated religions. Through an examination of their shared symbolism and practices, it is possible to gain insight into the common beliefs of pre-Islamic and Vedic societies.

The History of the Ethiopian David Harp

In ancient times, the use of a musical instrument known as the David harp was common among the Ethiopian Jews, who referred to the instrument as a “kinnor.” A kinnor is a three-stringed instrument that is believed to have derived from the Middle Eastern lyre and is made of an animal skin stretched over a circular wooden sound box. The strings are generally made of sheep gut, which produces a softer and more subtle sound than the strings made of metal which are found in modern harps. The David harvest was named after King David, who is said to have invented the instrument, according to Jewish tradition.

The use of the David harp can be traced back to the ninth century BCE and it is believed to have been brought to Ethiopia through the Jews of the diaspora who were fleeing religious persecution. The Jews of Ethiopia brought the harp with them and it became a part of their culture and practice of ethnic worship. In the 19th century, the instrument was highly popular among Jewish communities and it was used at weddings and religious ceremonies. The harp is also closely associated with the Amharic language, which is spoken in Ethiopia, as it is used to accompany fans during ceremonial singing and story-telling.

The use of a kinnor is mentioned in the Bible in many different contexts, including the story of King David and his use of the harp to calm King Saul (1 Samuel 16:23). The instrument was also seen as a symbol of devotion to God in the ancient world and it is closely associated with sacred practices. In addition, the kinnor was often used in Ethiopian Jewish music to accompany the melodies and rhythms of their religious practices.

The design of the David harp has changed over time and it is believed to be the ancestor of the modern harp. The Ethiopian Jews used a variety of materials in the construction of the David harp and they often decorated the instrument with colorful fabrics or gemstones. The players of the David harp were highly skilled and they often sang and composed their own songs.

Over time, the use of the David harp declined and the instrument was no longer played as frequently as it had been in the past. However, in recent years there has been a revival of interest in the traditional Ethiopian music and the kinnor has seen a resurgence in popularity in some areas.

In summary, the David harp is an ancient instrument that has a long and rich history in Ethiopia. The instrument is closely associated with the practice of ritual worship by the Ethiopian Jews and it has played an important part in Ethiopian culture for centuries. The David harp is also believed to be the ancestor of the modern harp and its use and design have changed over time. In recent years, the instrument has seen a resurgence in popularity and it continues to be used in certain areas.

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Hamid Bey – Coptic Mystic

When Hamid Bey was a small boy, he had a remarkable experience. He and his parents met with a scholar who felt he was a candidate for Coptic Temple training. His parents agreed.

In Coptic temple training, Hamid was taught spiritual disciplines in emotional and mental control and meditation. One lesson involved going out in the countryside to beg for food for the temple. His Master had told him to thank the people, whether they gave him anything or not. This task made a great impression on him.

As Hamid grew in years, so did the advanced pace of his training. He was taught to enter a state of suspended animation. This was achieved by placing his body at the complete command of his will.

There were six preparatory Temples of learning that Hamid passed through before he could enter the final temple, the Temple of Divine Wisdom. In order to get to this temple, it is necessary to swim the Nile and enter through a tunnel. The big test here is that the Nile is infested in this area with vast numbers of crocodiles. The only way to know whether crocodiles are in the murky water is to locate them by mind power. This is something Hamid and his classmates were taught in their previous years of intensive training.

In this last temple, Hamid passed through the greatest and final test. Here, a flower is cultivated which does not grow anywhere in the world except in deepest central Africa. It is a beautiful white flower that gradually opens and closes. When open, the perfume of the flower is very pleasant; but, is a deadly poison to humans. It is used to prove an initiate’s physical and mental control. The flower is placed in the center of a series of eleven concentric circles. The eleventh one is closest to the flower. The initiate begins with the outermost circle. He must sit for one hour in each circle and keep his body independent of the poison, beginning with the outermost circle. The initiate earns a ring for each circle mastered; moving him closer to the flower. Hamid Bey made it to the seventh circle, which made him a seven-ring Master. The rings were symbolically worn on his headdress. When he attained the seventh degree, Hamid felt that he should leave the temple and go out into the world.

Upon his graduation from training, Hamid was given the privilege of a personal meeting with the great Master of the temple. The hour he spent with him gave Hamid guiding inspiration throughout his life.

At the age of eighteen, Hamid returned home to his family in Cairo. He soon joined the armed forces that were being sent out from Egypt to do service in World War I. He spent the next few years in the air force. There was one occasion during the war when his ability to place himself into trance saved his life. He found himself behind the lines with the enemy fast upon him. He put himself into trance and the enemy soldiers completely ignored him, being certain that he was already dead.

After W.W.I., Hamid decided to go to Italy to publicly demonstrate the powers he had learned in the temple training. He wanted to convince a skeptical world that there is much more to a man than the outer form. His intention was to place himself in a state of suspended animation and be buried alive six feet underground for three days.

In 1927, the magician Houdini, was attracting worldwide attention and announced that he could duplicate, by mechanical means, any so-called spiritual phenomenon ever produced. Hamid Bey was sent to the United States at this time to challenge Houdini. Three weeks after Hamid arrived, Houdini died. Hamid, then not knowing any English or any of the customs, signed up as a vaudeville act under a binding two-year contract. He spent the next two years, much to his disdain, doing his “act” on stage three times a day for sometimes heckling audiences. After that experience, he became great friends with Paramhansa Yogananda and traveled with him doing shows and lectures together.

To maintain his temple rank of seven-ring Master, Hamid had to return to Egypt every seven years. He was required to go through additional tests and examinations by his Master. In 1936 when Hamid returned to Egypt, he had a great spiritual experience. He was taken astrally by his Master to the secret Archive Chamber of the Great Pyramid. It was at this time his true mission was revealed. He was to go to the United States, which was to become the new Holy Land, to establish the Coptic Order. In 1937, Master Hamid Bey founded the Coptic Fellowship in Los Angeles, California.

In the following years Hamid dedicated his life to teaching the Universal Principles of right living throughout the United States. Helping him was a pure, humble man from Switzerland, Master Stanley. Only a few details are known of Master Stanley’s background because he would seldom speak of himself or his past

As a young boy in Switzerland, Master Stanley had a spiritual experience that led him to become a teacher of Truth. One hot day he rode his bicycle up a very steep hill. When he reached the top, he was totally exhausted. He went into a state of suspended consciousness. In his words, “the Christ” came to him and spoke. This experience served as a guiding inspiration all his life. Master Stanley often spoke of the Christ’s message of Love, which he wanted to get to as many people as possible.

Master Stanley first was introduced to the Coptic Philosophy when he attended a lecture by Hamid Bey in Detroit, Michigan. A deep spiritual bond was immediately recognized between them. He was ordained by Master Hamid Bey. Master Stanley set about helping to spread the Coptic Teachings throughout the Midwest. He founded the Detroit Coptic Temple, established and taught at centers in Milwaukee, Toledo and Chicago, and went on to open ten more centers throughout the Midwest.

In the next twenty-three years, Hamid Bey, aided by Master Stanley, continued to teach and establish Coptic Centers in the United States. Master Stanley reached the point of transition from his life in 1972.

John Davis, an honorable and humble man from Michigan, was ordained as a Coptic Minister by Master Stanley in 1969. After Master Stanley’s passing, John Davis became the Midwest Coptic director. In 1974, the Coptic Fellowship held their first National Convention in Kalamazoo, Michigan.

On July 16, 1976, Hamid Bey left his physical body. This happened for two reasons: first, he realized that people were not concentrating on learning the truth for themselves; and secondly, they were concentrating on his dynamic personality. He passed over in a hospital in Los Angeles from what doctors called cardiac arrest. Hamid simply stopped his heart from beating.

Before his transition, Hamid Bey chose John Davis to take over as National Director. According to his wishes, Hamid’s body was cremated, and his ashes were scattered over the Pacific Ocean.

Today, Coptics are continually growing. We no longer stand on the threshold of the New Age; we have proven ourselves and have stepped through it. The present Coptic Fellowship still follow the teachings of Hamid Bey and are universal in purpose.

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Moroccan Desert Fennec Fox

The Fennec Fox is a species of fox native to the deserts of Morocco. The Fennec Fox is a small, sandy-coloured fox with a reddish tint to its fur, and is found living throughout the Sahara desert in Morocco and its surrounding regions. The Fennec Fox has a long and fascinating history, stretching back to the 19th century.

During the 19th century, the Fennec Fox was known by local Berber populations as “Simi,” or “Aunche.” In the early 20th century, British explorer Major Lionel Girdwood was the first person to observe the Fennec Fox in its native environment. During his travels, Major Girdwood encountered many of the lovely wildlife specimens the desert held, including the Fennec Fox.

The Fennec Fox was first studied and described in 1915 by French biologist and zoologist Auguste Dabry de Thiersant. Dabry de Thiersant gave the Fennec Fox its scientific name, Vulpes zerda, and also went on to describe its unique physical characteristics and adaptations to the harsh desert conditions.

The Fennec Fox is a very hardy creature, adapted to the extremes of the Sahara desert. It is about the size of a typical housecat, but has a much smaller head and a unique shape to its muzzle. It is omnivorous, and its diet includes insects, small mammals, and plants. One of its most useful adaptations is its long, furry tail, which serves as a counterbalance while the animal is running or jumping.

The Fennec Foxes are highly secretive and are rarely seen during the day, preferring to rest in their burrows or hide out in the shade of rocks or plants. They typically come out around twilight or dusk, when they are more likely to successfully hunt.

The Fennec Fox is an icon of the Moroccan desert, and its long history of inhabiting the desert is a testament to its hardiness and adaptability. It is an incredible creature, and one with fascinating characteristics and adaptations that make it perfectly adapted to its harsh desert home.

Learn how to Unlock Your Potential with “The Missing Code” ?

Therese Neumann, The Catholic Stigmatist ~ from the book Autobiography of a Yogi by Yogananda (Chapter 39)

“Return to india. I have waited for you patiently for fifteen years. Soon I shall swim out of the body and on to the Shining Abode. Yogananda, come!”

Sri Yukteswar’s voice sounded startlingly in my inner ear as I sat in meditation at my Mt. Washington headquarters. Traversing ten thousand miles in the twinkling of an eye, his message penetrated my being like a flash of lightning.

Fifteen years! Yes, I realized, now it is 1935; I have spent fifteen years in spreading my guru’s teachings in America. Now he recalls me.

That afternoon I recounted my experience to a visiting disciple. His spiritual development under Kriya Yoga was so remarkable that I often called him “saint,” remembering Babaji’s prophecy that America too would produce men and women of divine realization through the ancient yogic path.

This disciple and a number of others generously insisted on making a donation for my travels. The financial problem thus solved, I made arrangements to sail, via Europe, for India. Busy weeks of preparations at Mount Washington! In March, 1935 I had the Self- Realization Fellowship chartered under the laws of the State of California as a non-profit corporation. To this educational institution go all public donations as well as the revenue from the sale of my books, magazine, written courses, class tuition, and every other source of income.

“I shall be back,” I told my students. “Never shall I forget America.”

At a farewell banquet given to me in Los Angeles by loving friends, I looked long at their faces and thought gratefully, “Lord, he who remembers Thee as the Sole Giver will never lack the sweetness of friendship among mortals.”

I sailed from New York on June 9, 1935 in the Europa. Two students accompanied me: my secretary, Mr. C. Richard Wright, and an elderly lady from Cincinnati, Miss Ettie Bletch. We enjoyed the days of ocean peace, a welcome contrast to the past hurried weeks. Our period of leisure was short-lived; the speed of modern boats has some regrettable features!

THERESE NEUMANNTHERESE NEUMANN

Famous Catholic Stigmatist who inspired my 1935 pilgrimage to Konnersreuth, Bavaria
Like any other group of inquisitive tourists, we walked around the huge and ancient city of London.

The following day I was invited to address a large meeting in Caxton Hall, at which I was introduced to the London audience by Sir Francis Younghusband. Our party spent a pleasant day as guests of Sir Harry Lauder at his estate in Scotland. We soon crossed the English Channel to the continent, for I wanted to make a special pilgrimage to Bavaria.

This would be my only chance, I felt, to visit the great Catholic mystic, Therese Neumann of Konnersreuth.

Years earlier I had read an amazing account of Therese. Information given in the article was as follows:

(1) Therese, born in 1898, had been injured in an accident at the age of twenty; she became blind and paralyzed.

(2) She miraculously regained her sight in 1923 through prayers to St. Teresa, “The Little Flower.” Later Therese Neumann’s limbs were instantaneously healed.

(3) From 1923 onward, Therese has abstained completely from food and drink, except for the daily swallowing of one small consecrated wafer.

(4) The stigmata, or sacred wounds of Christ, appeared in 1926 on Therese’s head, breast, hands, and feet. On Friday of every week thereafter, she has passed through the Passion of Christ, suffering in her own body all his historic agonies.

(5) Knowing ordinarily only the simple German of her village, during her Friday trances Therese utters phrases which scholars have identified as ancient Aramaic. At appropriate times in her vision, she speaks Hebrew or Greek.

(6) By ecclesiastical permission, Therese has several times been under close scientific observation. Dr. Fritz Gerlick, editor of a Protestant German newspaper, went to Konnersreuth to “expose the Catholic fraud,” but ended up by reverently writing her biography.

As always, whether in East or West, I was eager to meet a saint. I rejoiced as our little party entered, on July 16th, the quaint village of Konnersreuth. The Bavarian peasants exhibited lively interest in our Ford automobile (brought with us from America) and its assorted group-an American young man, an elderly lady, and an olive-hued Oriental with long hair tucked under his coat collar.

Therese’s little cottage, clean and neat, with geraniums blooming by a primitive well, was alas! silently closed. The neighbors, and even the village postman who passed by, could give us no information. Rain began to fall; my companions suggested that we leave.

“No,” I said stubbornly, “I will stay here until I find some clue leading to Therese.”

Two hours later we were still sitting in our car amidst the dismal rain. “Lord,” I sighed complainingly, “why didst Thou lead me here if she has disappeared?”

An English-speaking man halted beside us, politely offering his aid.

“I don’t know for certain where Therese is,” he said, “but she often visits at the home of Professor Wurz, a seminary master of Eichstatt, eighty miles from here.”

The following morning our party motored to the quiet village of Eichstatt, narrowly lined with cobblestoned streets. Dr. Wurz greeted us cordially at his home; “Yes, Therese is here.” He sent her word of the visitors. A messenger soon appeared with her reply.

“Though the bishop has asked me to see no one without his permission, I will receive the man of God from India.”

Deeply touched at these words, I followed Dr. Wurz upstairs to the sitting room. Therese entered immediately, radiating an aura of peace and joy.

She wore a black gown and spotless white head dress. Although her age was thirty-seven at this time, she seemed much younger, possessing indeed a childlike freshness and charm. Healthy, well- formed, rosy-cheeked, and cheerful, this is the saint that does not eat!

Therese greeted me with a very gentle handshaking. We both beamed in silent communion, each knowing the other to be a lover of God.

Dr. Wurz kindly offered to serve as interpreter. As we seated ourselves, I noticed that Therese was glancing at me with naive curiosity; evidently Hindus had been rare in Bavaria.

“Don’t you eat anything?” I wanted to hear the answer from her own lips.

“No, except a consecrated rice-flour wafer, once every morning at six o’clock.”

“How large is the wafer?”

“It is paper-thin, the size of a small coin.” She added, “I take it for sacramental reasons; if it is unconsecrated, I am unable to swallow it.”

“Certainly you could not have lived on that, for twelve whole years?”

“I live by God’s light.” How simple her reply, how Einsteinian!

“I see you realize that energy flows to your body from the ether, sun, and air.”

A swift smile broke over her face. “I am so happy to know you understand how I live.”

“Your sacred life is a daily demonstration of the truth uttered by Christ: ‘Man shall not live by bread alone, but by every word that proceedeth out of the mouth of God.'”

Again she showed joy at my explanation. “It is indeed so. One of the reasons I am here on earth today is to prove that man can live by God’s invisible light, and not by food only.”

“Can you teach others how to live without food?”
She appeared a trifle shocked. “I cannot do that; God does not wish it.”

As my gaze fell on her strong, graceful hands, Therese showed me a little, square, freshly healed wound on each of her palms. On the back of each hand, she pointed out a smaller, crescent-shaped wound, freshly healed. Each wound went straight through the hand. The sight brought to my mind distinct recollection of the large square iron nails with crescent-tipped ends, still used in the Orient, but which I do not recall having seen in the West.

The saint told me something of her weekly trances. “As a helpless onlooker, I observe the whole Passion of Christ.” Each week, from Thursday midnight until Friday afternoon at one o’clock, her wounds open and bleed; she loses ten pounds of her ordinary 121-pound weight. Suffering intensely in her sympathetic love, Therese yet looks forward joyously to these weekly visions of her Lord.

I realized at once that her strange life is intended by God to reassure all Christians of the historical authenticity of Jesus’ life and crucifixion as recorded in the New Testament, and to dramatically display the ever-living bond between the Galilean Master and his devotees.

Professor Wurz related some of his experiences with the saint.

“Several of us, including Therese, often travel for days on sight- seeing trips throughout Germany,” he told me. “It is a striking contrast-while we have three meals a day, Therese eats nothing. She remains as fresh as a rose, untouched by the fatigue which the trips cause us. As we grow hungry and hunt for wayside inns, she laughs merrily.”

The professor added some interesting physiological details: “Because Therese takes no food, her stomach has shrunk. She has no excretions, but her perspiration glands function; her skin is always soft and firm.”

At the time of parting, I expressed to Therese my desire to be present at her trance.

“Yes, please come to Konnersreuth next Friday,” she said graciously. “The bishop will give you a permit. I am very happy you sought me out in Eichstatt.”

Therese shook hands gently, many times, and walked with our party to the gate. Mr. Wright turned on the automobile radio; the saint examined it with little enthusiastic chuckles. Such a large crowd of youngsters gathered that Therese retreated into the house. We saw her at a window, where she peered at us, childlike, waving her hand.

From a conversation the next day with two of Therese’s brothers, very kind and amiable, we learned that the saint sleeps only one or two hours at night. In spite of the many wounds in her body, she is active and full of energy. She loves birds, looks after an aquarium of fish, and works often in her garden. Her correspondence is large; Catholic devotees write her for prayers and healing blessings. Many seekers have been cured through her of serious diseases.

Her brother Ferdinand, about twenty-three, explained that Therese has the power, through prayer, of working out on her own body the ailments of others. The saint’s abstinence from food dates from a time when she prayed that the throat disease of a young man of her parish, then preparing to enter holy orders, be transferred to her own throat.

On Thursday afternoon our party drove to the home of the bishop, who looked at my flowing locks with some surprise. He readily wrote out the necessary permit. There was no fee; the rule made by the Church is simply to protect Therese from the onrush of casual tourists, who in previous years had flocked on Fridays by the thousands.

We arrived Friday morning about nine-thirty in Konnersreuth. I noticed that Therese’s little cottage possesses a special glass-roofed section to afford her plenty of light. We were glad to see the doors no longer closed, but wide-open in hospitable cheer. There was a line of about twenty visitors, armed with their permits. Many had come from great distances to view the mystic trance.

Therese had passed my first test at the professor’s house by her intuitive knowledge that I wanted to see her for spiritual reasons, and not just to satisfy a passing curiosity.

My second test was connected with the fact that, just before I went upstairs to her room, I put myself into a yogic trance state in order to be one with her in telepathic and televisic rapport. I entered her chamber, filled with visitors; she was lying in a white robe on the bed. With Mr. Wright following closely behind me, I halted just inside the threshold, awestruck at a strange and most frightful spectacle.

Blood flowed thinly and continuously in an inch-wide stream from Therese’s lower eyelids. Her gaze was focused upward on the spiritual eye within the central forehead. The cloth wrapped around her head was drenched in blood from the stigmata wounds of the crown of thorns. The white garment was redly splotched over her heart from the wound in her side at the spot where Christ’s body, long ages ago, had suffered the final indignity of the soldier’s spear-thrust.

Therese’s hands were extended in a gesture maternal, pleading; her face wore an expression both tortured and divine. She appeared thinner, changed in many subtle as well as outward ways. Murmuring words in a foreign tongue, she spoke with slightly quivering lips to persons visible before her inner sight.

As I was in attunement with her, I began to see the scenes of her vision. She was watching Jesus as he carried the cross amidst the jeering multitude.

Suddenly she lifted her head in consternation: the Lord had fallen under the cruel weight. The vision disappeared. In the exhaustion of fervid pity, Therese sank heavily against her pillow.

At this moment I heard a loud thud behind me. Turning my head for a second, I saw two men carrying out a prostrate body. But because I was coming out of the deep superconscious state, I did not immediately recognize the fallen person. Again I fixed my eyes on Therese’s face, deathly pale under the rivulets of blood, but now calm, radiating purity and holiness. I glanced behind me later and saw Mr. Wright standing with his hand against his cheek, from which blood was trickling.

“Dick,” I inquired anxiously, “were you the one who fell?”

“Yes, I fainted at the terrifying spectacle.”
“Well,” I said consolingly, “you are brave to return and look upon the sight again.”

Remembering the patiently waiting line of pilgrims, Mr. Wright and I silently bade farewell to Therese and left her sacred presence.

The following day our little group motored south, thankful that we were not dependent on trains, but could stop the Ford wherever we chose throughout the countryside. We enjoyed every minute of a tour through Germany, Holland, France, and the Swiss Alps. In Italy we made a special trip to Assisi to honor the apostle of humility, St. Francis. The European tour ended in Greece, where we viewed the Athenian temples, and saw the prison in which the gentle Socrates had drunk his death potion.

One is filled with admiration for the artistry with which the Greeks have everywhere wrought their very fancies in alabaster.

We took ship over the sunny Mediterranean, disembarking at Palestine. Wandering day after day over the Holy Land, I was more than ever convinced of the value of pilgrimage. The spirit of Christ is all- pervasive in Palestine; I walked reverently by his side at Bethlehem, Gethsemane, Calvary, the holy Mount of Olives, and by the River Jordan and the Sea of Galilee.

Our little party visited the Birth Manger, Joseph’s carpenter shop, the tomb of Lazarus, the house of Martha and Mary, the hall of the Last Supper. Antiquity unfolded; scene by scene, I saw the divine drama that Christ once played for the ages.

On to Egypt, with its modern Cairo and ancient pyramids. Then a boat down the narrow Red Sea, over the vasty Arabian Sea; lo, India.

Lia Fáil (Stone of Destiny) Ancient Shiva Linga in Ireland

In County Meath, Ireland, on the Hill of Tara sits a mysterious stone known as the Lia Fáil (Stone of Destiny). According to The Annals of the Four Masters, an ancient document written by Franciscan Monks between 1632-1636 AD, this stone was brought to Ireland by the Tuatha Dé Danann, a supernaturally gifted people. Some speculate it was they who brought the power to make bronze to Ireland. They were the main deities of pre-Christian Gaelic Ireland.

The Tuatha Dé Danann, meaning the children of the goddess Danu, are said to have ruled Ireland from 1897 B.C. to 1700 B.C. having arrived from the coast on ships. The Christian monks viewed the stone as a pagan stone idol symbolic of fertility. This stone was so important that it was used for the coronation of all Irish Kings up until 500 AD.

The goddess Danu in European tradition was a river goddess. We find her namesake in rivers such as the Danube, Don, Dneiper, & Dniestr rivers. In some Irish texts her father is said to be Dagda (the good god), a father figure in Irish tradition.

The Vedic tradition also has a goddess Danu, the daughter of Daksha, wife of Kasyapa Muni, who was a goddess of the rivers. The word Danu in Sanskrit means ‘flowing water’. As the daughter of Daksha, her sister Sati would have been married to Lord Shiva. Finally, Tara, meaning ‘star’ in Sanskrit, is another name for the wife of Lord Shiva. To practitioners of Vedic tradition the Lia Fáil matches very closely to the Shiva Linga.

Eventually the Tuatha Dé Danann were defeated in battle. According to legend, they were allowed to stay in Ireland only under the ground as the ‘Aes sidhe’ – people of the fairy mounds.

Royals with Red Hair and Blue Eyes??

There is a theory by some authors and researchers that most of the Royals, some of the Pharaohs, in particular Rameses II, and even Jesus & Mary Magdalene were Blue Eyed, Red heads with freckles… and thus they claim that they had to have been Caucasian Blue Eyed Red Heads.. but I gotta remind all that you can have red hair, freckles, blue, green or hazel eyes and still be Black, and even the Waka Blondes of New Zealand & Hawaii (Ehu) and the Blondes of Fiji & Solomon Islands can all still be dark or light skinned.

There are various sources online which propose this theory that all the Royals had Red or Blonde Hair and Blue Eyes.. and you can also search RH- Blood and Royals.. but my issue with some of these claims is that they almost always conclude that these Royals had to have been Caucasian then.. but through a simple google search you can see that Red Hair, Blonde Hair, Freckles, Blue, Green and Hazel Eyes can happen in Black and Brown people too.. so while rare… the rarity doesn’t conclusively mean all these royals must’ve been White. If indeed Red/Blonde Hair and Blue eyes was a signifying trait of the Royals.. it could’ve just as easily been that.. rare family of Black red heads with Blue/Green eyes… especially those that lived in Egypt, Africa or the Middle East.

Saint Sarah, Santa Sara La Kali, Sarah the Egyptian

Saint Sarah aka Santa Sara La Kali aka Sarah the Egyptian aka Sarasvati Lakshmi Kali, daughter of Jesus & Mary Magdalene, known by Catholics as Egyptian servant to the Three Mary’s as they fled from Roman persecution in Jerusalem to France to a place now known as Saintes Maries de la Mer in Camarque, France.

To the Romani Gypsies, she is Santa Sara la Kali, the Patron Saint of the Gypsies. To Gnostics, Essenes & Nazoreans she was actually the daughter of Jesus & Mary Magdalene, disguised as a servant to hide her true identity. It is said that, every year since their arrival the people have been celebrating the day of their arrival to France at the coast with a large pilgrimage festival. The day of the pilgrimage honouring Sarah is May 24; her statue is carried down to the sea on this day to re-enact her arrival in France.

Some authors have drawn parallels between the ceremonies of the pilgrimage and the worship of the Hindu goddess Kali (a form of Durga), subsequently identifying the two. Ronald Lee states:

“If we compare the ceremonies with those performed in France at the shrine of Sainte Sara (called Sara e Kali in Romani), we become aware that the worship of Kali/Durga/Sara has been transferred to a Christian figure… in France, to a non-existent “sainte” called Sara, who is actually part of the Kali/Durga/Sara worship among certain groups in India.”

The name “Sara” itself is seen in the appellation of Durga as Kali in the famed text Durgasaptashati.

In The Rozabal Line, author Ashwin Sanghi puts forward that Sara-la-Kali refers to the three Hindu goddesses – Saraswati, Lakshmi, and Kali – the goddesses of Knowledge, Wealth and Power – symbolizing the trinity of female power.