Tag Archives: Hinduism

The Divine Love of Shiva Shakti

On sacred realms where mountains stand tall,
Shiva and Shakti, a cosmic enthrall.
He, the ascetic adorned in ash’s embrace,
She, the divine force, the Shakti of grace.

In the dance of creation, their cosmic ballet,
Shiva’s stillness, Shakti’s vibrant array.
Mount Kailash witnessed their divine duet,
A cosmic rhythm, where energies met.

Her ardor fueled the fiery third eye’s glow,
As he adorned the crescent moon’s soft throw.
In the dance of life’s cycles, they entwine,
Shiva and Shakti, a union divine.

Through cosmic energies, their love unfolds,
A tale of creation, as ancient scriptures hold.
In the cosmic dance, they forever unite,
Shiva and Shakti, eternal cosmic light.

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Lord Shiva instructs his Sadhu Disciples

In the mist-clad peaks of Mount Kailash, the abode of divinity where silence speaks volumes, there sat Lord Shiva, the ascetic god of destruction and regeneration. His presence was as serene as the moonlit Himalayas, yet as intense as the fire that burns within the core of the earth. Surrounding him were his devoted sadhus, seekers of the ultimate truth, each one an embodiment of renunciation.

These ascetics, with ash smeared across their foreheads and bodies, signifying their continual death to the world of form, had gathered to absorb not the words, but the wisdom that emanated from the very being of Shiva. They were an assorted congregation; some young with fiery eyes fueled by the vigor of spiritual quests, others, old, with eyes deep as the cosmic sky, reflecting eons of contemplation.

Shiva, the great Yogi, sat in tranquil stillness, his eyes half-closed in a state between the manifest world and the unmanifest void. His trishula, the trident, stood beside him, symbolizing control over the physical, mental, and spiritual worlds. The crescent moon adorned his matted locks, and the mighty Ganga flowed from his hair, cascading down into the realms of man, a testament to his power to harness and release the torrents of cosmic energy.

As the sun began its descent, casting a golden cloak over the snow, Shiva opened his eyes, and in them, the universe seemed to dance. He spoke not through words but through the very essence of silence. His teachings were not of the scriptures but of existence. He taught the sadhus about the impermanence of the physical universe and the permanence of the self. He revealed to them the dance of creation and destruction, inherent in the flow of time, where every end was a prelude to a beginning.

He spoke of the beauty of detachment, how like the lotus, one must live in the world yet not be of it. His every gesture was a teaching, every pause a lesson in patience, every glance an initiation into the depths of consciousness.

As dusk turned to night, and the stars began to mirror the sparks of their meditative fires, the sadhus sat in profound meditation, absorbing the vibrations of Shiva’s presence. They realized that the ultimate teaching was not something to be grasped, but something to be lived. It was in the very act of living in harmony with the cosmos, in recognizing the oneness of all existence.

In the great silence of the Himalayas, under the watchful gaze of their eternal teacher, the sadhus found their truths. And Shiva, the Adiyogi, continued to sit in repose, his stillness an eternal testament to the wisdom beyond worlds. The cycle of night and day passed, seasons changed, but the quest of the sadhus remained — a quest quenched only by the profound waters of self-realization, a thirst for which they had forsaken all worldly desires.

And thus, the story of Lord Shiva and his disciples continues, in the hearts of those who seek, in the silence of the sages, and in the very air of Mount Kailash, where every breath whispers tales of liberation.

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The Eternal Love of Shiva & Parvati

In the realm where mystic rivers flow, In the embrace of ethereal glow, Two divine beings, a cosmic pair, Shiva and Parvati, a love beyond compare.

Shiva, the ascetic, with matted hair, A meditative soul in tranquil stare, Cloaked in ashes, the blue-skinned lord, In his presence, the universe is adored.

Parvati, radiant goddess of grace, With eyes that illuminate every space, Her beauty blossoms like flowers in bloom, Enchanting hearts with her celestial perfume.

In Mount Kailash, their celestial abode, Where serpents dance and mountains erode, Shiva meditates, detached and still, While Parvati’s love, his heart does fill.

Through eons of time, their love has endured, In cosmic dance, their union assured, Opposites they are, yet perfectly entwined, The eternal lovers, their souls aligned.

In the dance of creation, they unite, Their love a beacon, shining bright, From destruction to creation, they move as one, In the cosmic play, their love is spun.

In Ardhanarishvara, they merge as a whole, The divine balance, the cosmic goal, Male and female, fused in divine bliss, Their union a symbol of eternal oneness.

With Nandi, the bull, at Shiva’s feet, And Kartikeya, their son, so sweet, Ganesha, the elephant-headed one, Their celestial family, all love has won.

In their love, the universe finds solace, A divine romance, never to be erased, Shiva and Parvati, the cosmic flame, Igniting hearts, in love’s sacred name.

Through endless cycles, their story will flow, An eternal saga, forever aglow, Shiva and Parvati, divine and true, In their eternal love, we find our cue.

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Parallels between Hawaiian and Hindu Gods

The geographically and culturally distant civilizations of the ancient Hawaiians and Hindus of India share remarkable parallels in their religious deities. Though deities from each region are distinct, the divine figures of these two cultural pantheons used many of the same techniques to express the same religious ideals.  

Hawaiian gods and goddesses typically embody the natural elements of the islands, such as the ocean, mountains, rivers, and volcanoes. The Hawaiian pantheon has over 4,000 deities, each structured into a hierarchical family of gods and goddesses. Chief among the Hawaiian gods and goddesses is Ku; deity and personification of the primal darkness, chaos, and the process of creation and destruction. Ku, like the Hindu god, Shiva, is often depicted with various weapons and is associated with death, destruction, and fertility. Other Hawaiian gods and goddesses, including Kane the Sky Father, Kanaloa the god of the sea, and Pele the goddess of volcanoes, are similarly paralleled in the Hindu pantheon by Brahma, Vishnu, Shiva and the Goddess Kali.

In Hindu tradition, all gods are credited as aspects or manifestations of the ultimate reality that is Brahman. In the same way, the ultimate reality of the Hawaiian gods is expressed in their concept of Aumakua, who is the supreme being from which all the gods and goddesses originate. Aumakua (or Io, the Supreme One of Ancient Hawaiian tradition) is credited with having the ultimate power over death, destruction, and fertility. This conceptualization of a single source of all gods and goddesses echoes the monism expressed in the Hindu religion, where there is one unified source, Brahman, from which all aspects of reality emanate.

Other similarities between the Hindu and Hawaiian pantheons include the shared reverence for ancestors and the idea of kapu, or sacredness. Among Hindu gods, this reverence is expressed in the notion of ancestor worship, where offerings are made to the departed. The ancient Hawaiian religion also expresses similar veneration for departed ancestors. These ancestors are viewed as guides and protectors that inhabit the divine realm known as Po. In each culture, departed ancestors are thought to interact with the living and serve to protect them from harm.

Additionally, both Hawaiian and Hindu religions place strong emphasis on concepts such as respect, balance, and sustainability. As the Hawaiian gods maintain the ecological balance of the islands, the Hindu gods function in a similar manner throughout India. Respect and balance are seen in both pantheons as separate gods cooperate to maintain a sense of harmony and stability among the people. Nature veneration is also a shared concept between the two religious traditions, as humans are to show reverence to and respect the natural environment as sources of power and healing.

The parallels between the ancient gods of Hawaii and India demonstrate the remarkable ways in which two distant cultures can arrive at similar religious conceptualizations. Through each region’s pantheon of gods, common religious ideals emerge, emphasizing respect, resilience, and balance. Ultimately, the Hawaiian and Hindu gods serve as tangible reminders of the interconnectedness of global culture and religion.

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Ruda and Rudra: Parallels in Pre-Islamic and Vedic Society

For centuries, scholars have studied the similarities and differences between the polytheistic religions of the ancient world. One of the most interesting such comparisons is of Ruda and Rudra, two deities that each have roots in both the pre-Islamic era and the Vedic period. Through analysis of their shared gods, this article seeks to identify any possible commonalities of religious symbolism and practices in both regions.

Rudaw or Ruda is thought to be one of the chief gods in the ancient pre-Islamic polytheistic religion. He is said to have been a warlike god who brought violence and destruction to those who did not honor him. Rudra, meanwhile, is found within the Vedic religion and is thought to emerge from Indo-Aryan culture. He is known as the “storm god”, who symbolizes fear and the destructive power of nature and of the gods.

One key similarity between Ruda/Rudaw and Rudra is the symbolic relationship between violence and power. In both gods’ stories, there is an assumption that violence is necessary in order to maintain order and power in a community. This links back to the concept of “divine retribution,” a belief that the gods will punish those who have done wrong or have forgotten their devotion to the gods. This concept is found in both pre-Islamic and Vedic religions.

Another commonality between Rudaw and Rudra can be found in their dual-faced nature. Rudaw was thought to have two faces: a benevolent one, and a cruel one. This duality was seen as a reflection of the power of Rudaw. Similarly, Rudra is also said to be two- faced: a responsible and an indulgent one. This duality is often seen as an indication of Rudra’s complex nature, as well as a representation of the balance of power. 

Finally, both gods are associated with the moon, which holds a special significance in various ancient religions. For Rudaw, the moon symbolizes the cycle of life and death, as well as the power to create and destroy. For Rudra, the moon is a reminder of the never-ending cycle of life and death, as well as the power of the gods.

Despite some distinctions between Rudaw and Rudra, there are certainly a number of similarities to be drawn between them. Beyond the obvious comparison of the two gods, these similarities suggest a shared belief system in pre-Islamic and Vedic societies. Whether or not these connections had an influence or effect on one another remains an open question. 

Ultimately, it is clear that there are a number of similarities between Ruda and Rudra and their associated religions. Through an examination of their shared symbolism and practices, it is possible to gain insight into the common beliefs of pre-Islamic and Vedic societies.

Sadhus – Holy Men of India

India is a land of mystery, culture and religions. One of the most unique and extraordinary features of India is its sadhus. A sadhu is a holy man, an ascetic who renounces worldly life and devotes his time to meditation and spiritual pursuits.

The sadhus of India have been an important part of the culture for centuries. They are typically found dressed in bright saffron robes and orange wrap around skirts called dhoti. They often have matted dreadlocks and can be found walking around singing or chanting mantras or seated in meditation. They are easily recognizable by their symbols of divinity – ash markings, auspicious strings of rudraksha beads, and a trishul (trident).

The sadhus of India are not just wandering holy men, but they are great teachers of the spiritual and cosmic energy of the universe. They are the guardians of ancient Hindu spiritual practices, and are said to protect people from harm and bad omens. They also promote the ideals of peace, love, and tolerance among all people regardless of their religion or creed.

The sadhus of India provide an interesting glimpse into the ancient mysteries of India. They are a great source of knowledge and insight into the deep spiritual traditions that have been practiced for many centuries in this part of the world.

In traditional Hinduism, living a life of the Sadhu is considered to be one of the highest callings. Sadhus have reached an extreme level of spiritual development and are often revered as living masters. They are thought to have achieved moksha, or ultimate freedom.

Sadhus also give spiritual guidance to people who come to seek their advice and knowledge. They often live in ashrams or temples, where people can go to seek advice and gain spiritual knowledge from them. Sadhus are also known to visit villages and towns, in order to spread their spiritual knowledge.

The tradition of the Sadhu is an important part of Hinduism, and will be practiced for many years to come.

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Prithvi Mudra

Prithvi Mudra, translated as “earth gesture,” is a hand mudra, or energy seal, that is commonly used in yoga, meditation, and other spiritual traditions for calming the mind and extending grounding energy. Prithvi Mudra is believed to represent the element earth, and its practice is thought to bring balance and stability to both physical and emotional health.

The mudra is performed by pressing the tips of the ring finger and thumb together while keeping the other three fingers extended. This seal is gentle and peaceful, and it is believed to calm the mind and connect one to the earth, thereby inducing a sense of calmness and stability.

In addition to its calming effects, Prithvi Mudra is believed to have a number of health benefits. It is thought to improve digestion, strengthen bones and joints, nourish the skin, and regulate metabolism. Practicing this mudra is also said to reduce symptoms of stress, fatigue, and insomnia.

Practicing Prithvi Mudra is also thought to improve concentration, intuition, and mental clarity. It is believed to increase focus and aid in both physical and spiritual growth. Additionally, it is used to help cultivate gratitude, generosity, and peacefulness.

In terms of meditation, Prithvi Mudra acts as a grounding tool that helps the practitioner remain grounded and present. It can be practiced anytime, such as before or during seated meditation or pranayama breathing exercises. It can also greatly help the mind remain relaxed and focused during periods of stress and anxiety.

Overall, Prithvi Mudra is a powerful gesture for physical and mental wellbeing that can help to promote a sense of calm, connection, and balance. It is an easy hand mudra to incorporate in everyday life and can provide an array of physical and mental health benefits.

Prithvi Mudra, or Earth Mudra, is an ancient yogic gesture originating in India however is used in various religions around the world today. Although it is predominantly used in Hindu and Buddhist belief systems, Prithvi Mudra also appears in Christian iconography as an embodiment of Jesus Christ.

Prithvi Mudra is a hand position in the practice of yoga, used to honor and connect with the elemental energy of the earth. The mudra itself is made by extending the thumb finger, while folding the other three fingers against the palm. It is believed that Prithvi Mudra creates a sense of groundedness in one’s physical and spiritual foundations.

This spiritual grounding of the earthly world and humanity of Jesus may be why several Christian iconographers have included Prithvi Mudra in their depiction of Jesus in his human form. Some examples of this can be found in the art of El Greco, Michelangelo and other renowned masters. As Christianity emphasizes the spiritual importance of rootedness in the physical body, Prithvi Mudra helps to convey Jesus’ connection to humanity and his ability to understand and sympathize with the everyday struggles of life.

In the Catholic & Eastern Church, Jesus’ presence and embodiment of the earthly world is most notably conveyed in the iconic Eucharistic ceremony. During the ceremony, Jesus breaks bread and says, “This is my body, given for you; do this in remembrance of me.” This gesture of breaking bread, which is connected to Prithvi Mudra in Yoga, brings Jesus’ physical manifestation of the earthly self closer to worshipers.

Apart from his role as an embodiment of groundedness, the use of Prithvi Mudra in Christian art can also be seen as a sign of unity and mutual respect between different religious traditions. Jesus’ inviting gesture combines the power and potential of both Christianity and Yoga and communicates a message of harmony and acceptance between diverse spiritual creeds. Thus, Prithvi Mudra’s utilization in Christian iconography serves as a powerful reminder of how all beings share in the same fundamental needs and goals and how religious and spiritual practices should be used to unite, rather than divide, humanity.

Prithvi Mudra has been found at times a prominent feature in Christian art, as it encapsulates Jesus’ presence on Earth as well as conveys a unified message of acceptance among different religious traditions. By combining the spiritual, physical and symbolic aspects of the mudra, Christian iconographers help to bring Jesus’ relationship to the earthly world to life for people of all faiths and beliefs.

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Narasimha the Lion King

The Narasimha avatar of Vishnu is one of the most popular and important avatars of Vishnu. It is believed to have occurred at the end of the Treta Yuga. The story of Narasimha as told in Hindu mythology is as follows:

The demon king Hiranyakashipu had been granted a boon by Lord Brahma that nothing on earth, neither man nor animal could kill him. Knowing of his invincibility, Hiranyakashipu grew increasingly powerful, prideful and arrogant. As his tyranny worsened, the people of the world started to suffer from his rule.

In response to Hiranyakashipu’s wickedness, Lord Vishnu took the form of Narasimha (half-man, half-lion) in order to save his devotee Prahlada and the people of the world. Vishnu took the form at dusk, knowing that neither Hiranyakashipu nor anyone else would be able to recognize him. Vishnu appeared with terrifying arms, four faces, and power greater than anyone had ever seen before.

When Hiranyakashipu challenged Vishnu to a fight, Vishnu grabbed the demon king and placed him on his lap. Since Hiranyakashipu had been granted that nothing on earth would kill him, and Vishnu was neither man nor animal, the Avatar was able to tear apart the demon king with his fingernails.

This incident marked the end of Hiranyakashipu’s tyranny and the beginning of peace in the world. Vishnu’s act of protecting Prahlada and destroying Hiranyakashipu, demonstrated the power of devotion and taught the world that evil forces will never win in the face of absolute faith and love.

Since then, Lord Vishnu in the form of Narasimha has become one of the most venerated and popular deities in Hinduism. His image can be found in various temples and other places of worship all over the world. Narasimha is also worshipped during festivals and special occasions, usually in the form of prayers and Thirumanjanams (fire sacrifices).

Art by Art is Well ????️

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Haile Selassie I speaks about Lord Rama

“We see how the effulgence arising from the Lord Ram, who overcame Ravana in a fair fight, is as brilliant as ever; and since it has an abiding inviolability, no power on earth can undermine it.”

  • From “God, The Almighty: Commonly Entitled The Second Coming of the Lord,” A Talk Given on the Occasion of the Silver Jubilee of Emperor Haile Selassie I

“The victory of Lord Rama signifies the victory of righteousness and justice. In the same way, we can transform our own lives to a victory of righteousness and justice over all the forces of evil that enslave mankind.”

  • From a speech given by Haile Selassie I at the 62nd Convention of the Supreme Council of The Order of DeMolay, Washington, D.C, October 2, 1966.

“Lord Rama is an example for whole of mankind, for he was a merciful and just ruler who accepted punishment for his mistakes as readily as he accepted victory for his righteous actions.”

  • From a speech given on the occasion of the 1975 Silver Jubilee celebrations of Emperor Haile Selassie I.
Haile Selassie I claimed he was a descendant of Lord Rama through his son Kush, who was the father of the Kushites, whom the Ethiopians are historically known as.
Lord Rama & Goddess Sita
Prince of Peace
Jah Rastafari

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Prana Mudra

Prana Mudra is a type of hand gesture used in yoga and meditation. It is used to gather and focus the universal life force, or prana, into the body. Prana is believed to be the life force that animates everything in the universe. Prana Mudra is believed to balance the chakras and enhance overall wellbeing, while also promoting physical and mental health.

History :

Prana Mudra is said to originate from India and is an ancient practice, appearing in texts dating back to the Vedic period (1500 – 500 BC). According to traditional Hindu, Buddhist and yogic texts, Prana Mudra practices were used as an effective way to connect with the life force and bring balance to the body and mind. Prana Mudra is said to have been rediscovered by modern-day yogis and meditation practitioners to bring about healing, creativity, and clarity.

Benefits :

The practice of Prana Mudra is believed to have many benefits for both physical and mental health. It is said to increase energy and vitality, reduce tension and stress, balance the chakras and enhance self-awareness. It is also thought to improve concentration and focus, boost creativity and promote mental health.

How to Perform Prana Mudra :

Prana Mudra is a simple and easy to practice hand gesture. To do Prana Mudra, sit in a comfortable position and place the palms of your hands together. Touch the tips of your ring and pinky finger to your thumb. The index and middle finger should be pointed straight. Keep your hands in this position for several minutes, or as long as it is comfortable. While performing Prana Mudra, focus on your breath and allow the energy to flow freely throughout your body.

Prana Mudra is a simple yet powerful technique that can be used to enhance physical and mental wellbeing. Practicing Prana Mudra is said to increase energy and vitality, reduce stress, balance the chakras and promote mental health. It is an easy to practice and accessible hand gesture that can be done while sitting in a comfortable position and with minimal equipment.

Jesus was often depicted in ancient art doing Prana Mudra

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